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COVID-19 Status Update for 01/14/2021

Marin County COVID-19 Status Update for January 14 includes answers to top vaccination questions; new rental assistance options for those impacted by the pandemic; a new eviction moratorium; and updated COVID-19 data.

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COVID-19

in Marin County

9,005

Total Cases
+115

1,100

Cases in Past 14 Days
+31

275

Total Hospitalized
+0

281,499

Total Tested
+0
Last Updated: 01.15.21 - 7:46 AM PST. Total Tested numbers not updated on holidays. See More Data
A quarantined person in their home using a laptop.

Public Health Orders in effect for Marin County

Curious which public health orders are still in effect for Marin County?  We've gathered all of the applicable health orders and related information into one location for you!

COVID-19 Response

A collection of videos covering Marin's response to COVID-19

Click to view our daily updates

Daily Update Videos

Frequently Asked Questions

At this point, social bubble activities should be outdoors only.

06/24/2020 - 18:15

Masks with a one-way valve (typically a raised plastic cylinder about the size of a quarter on the front or side of the mask) are designed for industrial use, such as construction or carpentry work, to protect the user from inhaling dust and certain particles encountered during sanding projects, sawing, sweeping, etc.  While these masks may protect the wearer from breathing particles, the valve also permits respiratory droplets to exit the mask, putting others nearby at risk. 

The purpose of both Marin's and the State of California's facial covering order is to prevent the spread of respiratory droplets from one wearer to another. COVID-19 can be spread by people who do not have symptoms and do not know that they are infected. Use of face coverings lowers the risk that an undiagnosed carrier will transmit it to others.

Wearing a mask with a valve makes it impossible to keep with the spirit of ‘your mask protects me, my mask protects you.'

Any mask that incorporates a one-way valve is not a proper Face Covering under Marin's Facial Covering Public Health Order and is not to be used to comply with the order's requirements.  A store or business can prohibit you from entering the building if you do not have a face covering or if you are wearing a mask with a valve.

06/30/2020 - 08:14

Travel increases your chance of getting and spreading COVID-19. Staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others from COVID-19.   However, if you must travel, we strongly recommend wearing a mask in public settings, staying at least 6 feet away from anyone who is not from your household, wash your hands with soap and water (or use hand sanitizer) for at least 20 seconds after using a public restroom, and follow additional CDC guidance to minimize your exposure to COVID-19 while traveling.  

While Marin Public Health is not currently requiring quarantine after you return from travel, we strongly recommend you monitor for symptoms on return and contact your healthcare provider if you develop symptoms or are notified that you have had a COVID-19 exposure.  If notified of exposure, you should quarantine immediately.  

Remember, you may have been exposed to COVID-19 on your travels. You may feel well and not have any symptoms, but you can be contagious without symptoms and spread the virus to others. You and your travel companions (including children) pose a risk to your family, friends, and community for 14 days after you were exposed to the virus. Regardless of where you traveled or what you did during your trip, take these actions to protect others from getting sick after you return: 

  • When around others, stay at least 6 feet (about 2 arms’ length) from other people who are not from your household. It is important to do this everywhere, both indoors and outdoors. 
  • Wear a mask to keep your nose and mouth covered when you are outside of your home. 
  • Wash your hands often or use hand sanitizer (with at least 60% alcohol). 
  • Watch your health and look for symptoms of COVID-19. Take your temperature if you feel sick. 
11/01/2020 - 18:57

If you think you have had an exposure to COVID-19, you should wait 4-5 days from day of exposure prior to getting tested. As defined by the CDC "The incubation period for COVID-19 is thought to extend to 14 days, with a median time of 4-5 days from exposure to symptoms onset.1-3 One study reported that 97.5% of persons with COVID-19 who develop symptoms will do so within 11.5 days of SARS-CoV-2 infection.3" 

 

12/07/2020 - 13:35

There is not enough information currently available to say if or for how long after infection someone is protected from getting COVID-19 again; this is called natural immunity. Re-infections have been documented. Early evidence suggests natural immunity from COVID-19 may not last very long, but more studies are needed to better understand this. Until we have a vaccine available and the ACIP makes recommendations to CDC on how to best use COVID-19 vaccines, CDC cannot comment on whether people who had COVID-19 should get a COVID-19 vaccine.

Learn more about the COVID-19 Vaccine in Marin County on our vaccine information webpage.

12/13/2020 - 16:09

Additional Information

For Providers

Marin County Public Health is accepting health care provider testing referrals and self-referrals by essential workers. Prioritized groups now include symptomatic and asymptomatic healthcare workers, first responders, and other essential workers.

Marin County Public Health has issued guidance for healthcare facilities and medical providers to guide efforts such as testing, post-test isolation and safety, at-home quarantine and isolation, use of masks and gloves, and more.

Access educational materials such as the EMS Field guide, hospital follow-up information, EMS safety videos, donning and doffing protocol, among other resources.

For Businesses

Access public health guidelines that are available for businesses and industries to reopen during the COVID-19 pandemic.

What types of businesses are allowed to reopen? Review Marin’s progress and projected dates for further industry reopenings.

From signage to PPE suppliers, browse a curated list of resources to help businesses of all sizes reopen safely.