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COVID-19 Status Update for 09/21/2020

The status update for September 21, 2020 includes a video update from Dr. Matt Willis; upcoming Webinars for Restaurants & Personal Care businesses; An informational update on local, state and federal protections for tenants… Read More

COVID-19 Status Update for 03/16/2020

Today, the public health officers of seven Bay Area jurisdictions, including Marin, issued a legal order directing residents to shelter at home for three weeks beginning March 17.

COVID-19 activity in Marin:

Marin County Public Health continues to advance policies to limit community spread and support our excellent healthcare partners’ capacity to respond.

Public Health Order

Today, the public health officers of seven Bay Area jurisdictions, including Marin, issued a legal order directing residents to shelter at home for three weeks beginning March 17. The order limits activity, travel and business functions to only the most essential needs.

Scientific evidence shows social distancing is one of the most effective approaches to slow the transmission of communicable disease. The shelter-at-home order follows new data of increasing local transmission of COVID-19, including 258 confirmed cases of COVID-19 with 4 deaths shared by the seven jurisdictions (as of March 15). This includes eleven cases in Marin.

The Public Health Order is in effect until April 7, 2020 until 11:59PM. To answer questions related to the Public Health Order, we created an extensive Q&A document to help understand the Order. Non-essential businesses shall cease operations except to maintain minimum basic operations. Essential businesses include:

  • Healthcare Operations and Essential Infrastructure
  • Grocery stores, certified farmers’ markets, farm and produce stands, supermarkets, food banks, convenience stores, and other establishments engaged in the retail sale of canned food, dry goods, fresh fruits and vegetables, pet supply, fresh meats, fish, and poultry, and any other household consumer products (such as cleaning and personal care products).
  • Food cultivation, including farming, livestock, and fishing
  • Businesses that provide food, shelter, and social services, and other necessities of life for economically disadvantaged or otherwise needy individuals
  • Newspapers, television, radio, and other media services
  • Gas stations and auto-supply, auto-repair, and related facilities
  • Banks and related financial institutions
  • Hardware stores
  • Plumbers, electricians, exterminators, and other service providers who provide services that are necessary to maintaining the safety, sanitation, and essential operation of residences
  • Businesses providing mailing and shipping services, including post office boxes
  • Laundromats, drycleaners, and laundry service providers
  • Restaurants and other facilities that prepare and serve food, but only for delivery or carry out.
  • Schools and other entities that typically provide free food services to students or members of the public may continue to do so
  • Businesses that supply products needed for people to work from home
  • Businesses that ship or deliver groceries, food, goods or services directly to residences
  • Airlines, taxis, and other private transportation providers providing transportation services
  • Home-based care for seniors, adults, or children
  • Residential facilities and shelters for seniors, adults, and children
  • Childcare facilities providing services that enable employees exempted in this order to work as permitted. To the extent possible, childcare facilities must operate under the following mandatory conditions:
    1. Childcare must be carried out in stable groups of 12 or fewer (“stable” means that the same 12 or fewer children are in the same group each day).
    2. Children shall not change from one group to another.
    3. If more than one group of children is cared for at one facility, each group shall be in a separate room. Groups shall not mix with each other.
    4. Childcare providers shall remain solely with one group of children.

For a more extensive explanation of what businesses are essential, and everything about the Order, please refer to the Public Health Order.

Message from the Public Health Officer:

For today’s update, Dr. Matt Willis, Marin County’s Public Health Officer, provides clarity on what the Public Health Order will mean for Marin County moving forward.

Youtube Video
Remote video URL

Where to get the latest information:

Visit the official Marin County Coronavirus webpage (MarinHHS.org/coronavirus) review answers to frequently asked questions, access guidance for special groups and subscribe for email updates. To view past status updates concerning COVID-19 activity in Marin County, click on the resources tab on the Coronavirus webpage.

Have questions? Individuals can contact Marin Health and Human Services with non-medical questions about the coronavirus by calling (415) 473-7191 (Monday – Friday, 9:30am to 12-noon and 1pm to 5pm) or emailing COVID-19@marincounty.org.