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COVID-19 Status Update for 09/25/2020

The status update for September 25, 2020 includes guidelines for Halloween and Dia de los Muertos celebrations; updated COVID-19 data, updates on Woodward Fire, Red Flag Warnings and Hot Weather for weekend, and PSPS preparedness… Read More

Frequently Asked Questions

Social bubbles are meant for groups who want to socialize on a regular basis for a three-week period of time. You can’t keep adding new people to the bubble or swapping in others. It’s important to keep the bubble small and make sure everyone is on the same page about health guidelines and the protective actions (e.g., physically distance, wear face coverings, etc.) the group will take together.

Last Updated 06/24/2020 - 18:16

The State of California issued a mask / face covering mandate on June 18, that is more restrictive than Marin's Facial Covering order and should be followed.  In sum, children over 2 years old should follow the State of California's order, which requires face masks when out in public.  You can find more information about proper mask fitting and scenarios for wearing a mask here.

Regarding summer camps, youth activities and child care / day care environments: the State of California's order defers to the local level, therefore, operators of summer camps, youth activities, and child care can continue to follow Marin's guidelines.  In a summer camp, youth activities or child care environment, children 12 years and over are required to wear face coverings. In a summer camp, youth activities, or child care environment, children over 2 up to 12 years old should be encouraged to wear them as much as reasonable, with supervision, however, they are not required to wear them.  Children 2 and under are not supposed to wear face coverings.  Children over the age of 2 should wear cloth face coverings when not actively engaged in physical activity to reduce the risk for transmission only if the parent and provider determine they can reliably wear, remove, and handle face coverings following CDC guidance throughout the day. Children under 12 wearing a cloth face covering shall be actively monitored by child care, youth activity, or summer camp personnel at all times.

Last Updated 08/25/2020 - 19:46

Maybe. Office colleagues should be following the guidelines for a safe office space work environment. If you want to regularly socialize after work with your colleagues and add them to your bubble, you may do so, but you must keep the same bubble members for three weeks.

Last Updated 06/24/2020 - 18:15

Yes. Even if you have already had COVID-19, you still may be contagious or have the ability to pass the virus to others.

Last Updated 06/30/2020 - 08:06

Yes, all members of a household must be counted towards the same social bubble.

Last Updated 06/24/2020 - 18:11

Yes. All individuals are required to wear a mask at a business, both indoor and outdoor businesses, whether as an employee or a customer. A store or business can prohibit you from entering their business if you do not have a face covering. However, if you have a medical condition or disability that prevents you from safely wearing a face covering, then you should speak with a store manager or employee about a reasonable accommodation to help you obtain the services you need without endangering your health or the health of other shoppers.

Last Updated 06/30/2020 - 08:08

At this point, social bubble activities should be outdoors only.

Last Updated 06/24/2020 - 18:15

Masks with a one-way valve (typically a raised plastic cylinder about the size of a quarter on the front or side of the mask) are designed for industrial use, such as construction or carpentry work, to protect the user from inhaling dust and certain particles encountered during sanding projects, sawing, sweeping, etc.  While these masks may protect the wearer from breathing particles, the valve also permits respiratory droplets to exit the mask, putting others nearby at risk. 

The purpose of both Marin's and the State of California's facial covering order is to prevent the spread of respiratory droplets from one wearer to another. COVID-19 can be spread by people who do not have symptoms and do not know that they are infected. Use of face coverings lowers the risk that an undiagnosed carrier will transmit it to others.

Wearing a mask with a valve makes it impossible to keep with the spirit of ‘your mask protects me, my mask protects you.'

Any mask that incorporates a one-way valve is not a proper Face Covering under Marin's Facial Covering Public Health Order and is not to be used to comply with the order's requirements.  A store or business can prohibit you from entering the building if you do not have a face covering or if you are wearing a mask with a valve.

Last Updated 06/30/2020 - 08:14

Three weeks relates to the incubation period for the COVID-19 virus.

Last Updated 06/24/2020 - 18:15

Yes. If you are in a public space, you are required to wear a face covering even if you do not have symptoms or feel sick. People with COVID-19 sometimes do not have a fever, cough, or other COVID-19 symptoms, but can unknowingly, spread the virus to others. Wearing a face covering is meant to protect other people in case you are infected and do not know it.

Last Updated 09/09/2020 - 11:19

No, social bubbles can only be a maximum of 12 individuals.

Last Updated 06/24/2020 - 18:14

The State of California's mandate of face coverings requires any person over 2 years of age to wear a face covering when in a public place, especially when:

  • at indoor AND outdoor businesses – whether as an employee or a customer
  • waiting in line to enter a store
  • waiting for and using public transit
  • when in a taxi or rideshare
  • when seeking healthcare; or visiting a hospital, medical clinic, pharmacy, laboratory, dental office, veterinary clinic or blood bank
  • walking outside and within 6 feet of others (about the length of a mattress)

Exceptions may be made for individuals with medical conditions or disabilities that prevent them from safely wearing a face covering. For more information, visit coronavirus.marinhhs.org/masks

Last Updated 06/30/2020 - 08:18

Social bubbles are groups of people that must be consistent for three weeks, not interacting with others outside the bubble closer than Social Distancing rules require. After three weeks, people may regroup in new bubbles as long as they are healthy. There is no break required between bubble periods.

Last Updated 06/24/2020 - 18:14

A face covering is a mask or cloth face covering that covers your nose and mouth. The face covering should allow for breathing without restriction. There is no requirement to wear a hospital grade mask or other specific type or brand of face covering. You may wear a homemade face covering, if it fits closely and covers your nose and mouth.

For more specific information on how to make or care for your face covering, visit https://coronavirus.marinhhs.org/masks.

Last Updated 06/30/2020 - 08:19

No. The total number of people for one bubble should be 12 people. Therefore, a family of four should only add eight people.

Last Updated 06/24/2020 - 18:12

It is permissible for an employer to require employees be tested for COVID and share their results with the employer, as long as the test is “job-related and consistent with business necessity.”

It is important that employees be virus-free when they come to work. Requiring testing and requiring employees to share the results is permissible. The employer must keep the employee medical information confidential and must maintain it separately from the employee’s personnel file.

 

 

Last Updated 07/30/2020 - 17:47

No, housekeepers do not need to be part of your social bubble. Currently, the rules state that you should not be at home while your housekeeper is working so you should not have direct contact with him/her. Also, social bubbles are meant for outdoor activities at this point.

Last Updated 06/24/2020 - 18:13

No, not when used by themselves (without a mask).  The purpose of face shields is to protect the facial area and eyes, nose and mouth from splashes, sprays or splatters of body fluids and are usually used by health care workers, dental providers, and other emergency medical providers.

Face shields are generally not used alone, but in conjunction with other protective equipment like a mask.

Face shields do not hug the face like a mask. Face shields used without masks still allow the respiratory droplets to escape because the shields are open on the sides and bottom.  In the sense of “my mask protects you, your mask protects me” a face shield used alone does not stop the flow of respiratory droplets like wearing an appropriate fitting mask or face covering does. 

Last Updated 08/24/2020 - 11:30

It depends on the household situation of those 11 friends. For example, if one of the friends belongs to a household of four people, then the entire household (all four people) would need to join your bubble, not just the individual friend. Remember, social bubble membership is exclusive. So, in the off chance you’re “bubbling” with 11 other single (no children, live alone) adults, all of you would need to remain committed to stick with that same group for a minimum of three weeks.

Last Updated 06/24/2020 - 18:11

Yes, but this is a higher-risk bubble. But please take your usual precautions with hand washing and sanitizing for the safety of your family and your social bubble friends. One tip: it’s important for people who create bubbles that include members at higher risk for serious illness to keep those bubbles as small as possible.

Last Updated 06/24/2020 - 18:12

The success and failure of the social bubble concept depends not only on your personal actions but also everybody else. It’s about solidarity. Keeping our bubbles small and consistent is really important to prevent an increase in the number of infections and a stress on our health care providers and hospitals.  It’s best to be upfront about what levels of contact you expect to be having.  Set ground rules together, since your idea of proper contact may not be the same as someone else in your bubble.  Remember: their behavior impacts your health and vice versa.  

Last Updated 06/24/2020 - 18:16

Technically, yes. But, it’s important to take precautions. Social bubbles are an excellent way to allow families across multiple households to come together once again. However, older adults are especially vulnerable to severe symptoms of COVID-19. Therefore, all members of a social bubble should continue to practice other protective measures of physical distancing, wearing face coverings, frequent hand washing, staying home when sick, and obeying isolation or quarantine guidelines if a member of the social bubble is diagnosed or exposed to COVID-19. People who are forming a bubble that includes people over 65 or those at high risk should consider a smaller-sized bubble with a very cautious approach to outside contact.

Last Updated 06/24/2020 - 18:12

Depending on the activity that you and your social bubble are participating in, make sure you are in compliance with the California State guidelines for masks and face coverings. When in doubt, wear a face covering.

We suggest that you figure out what level of risk each social bubble member is comfortable with before agreeing to be in each other’s bubble. Make sure you are creating a social bubble with people you really trust so that everyone feels comfortable and safe. 

MORE INFORMATION

Last Updated 06/30/2020 - 10:57

Child care or summer camp or youth activity bubbles are separate from household bubbles. This means that if you send your child to camp or preschool or other youth activity, you don't have to forgo bubbling with your extended family or friends. Your child can be in both bubbles. As of August 17, 2020, a child can participate in two bubbles outside their household (childcare or camp or youth activity) during any three week period. 

For more information, please visit our Marin Recovers website. 

Last Updated 08/25/2020 - 16:38

A social bubble is a stable group of 12 individuals or less, who can attend outdoor social or other outdoor events together. A social bubble may be made up of a combination of households, but no household or person may participate in more than one Social Bubble (except for children in childcare situations, explained below). Each member of the household must be counted as part of the same social bubble.

Last Updated 08/25/2020 - 16:40

You can’t keep adding new people to the bubble or swapping in others. It’s important to keep the bubble small and make sure everyone is on the same page about health guidelines for the three-week timeframe. Therefore, you would have to wait until the end of the three-week period to add another family to the social bubble.

Last Updated 06/24/2020 - 18:11

“Neighbor-to-neighbor” assistance is reaching out to your neighbor(s) by phone, email, text, or going to their home to check on them, to see if there is anything they need that you are able to help them with, such as groceries. If you go to their home, please knock and back up 6 feet before they answer. Follow the safety guidelines above to keep vulnerable people safe. Try to connect people with official resources as much as possible.

NextDoor.com Help Map

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 17:16

All individuals are required to wear masks/face coverings when at a business, both indoors or outdoors, whether employee or customer.  Businesses are required to enforce this, so if a restaurant asks you to keep your mask on while you are waiting for your food to arrive, or after you have finished your meal, please comply.

You can remove your mask to address basic biological necessities like eating and drinking, but you should replace your mask as soon as possible if you have to remove it.  This is especially important if you are eating or drinking in public areas -- indoors or outdoors.  Wash your hands or use hand sanitizer both before and after handling your face covering. 

(source: Marin Public Health Order)

Last Updated 07/13/2020 - 17:19

You should wash your hands for a minimum of 20 seconds using soap and water.  An easy way to “time” your hand washing is to sing the “happy birthday" song twice.

This video is a good illustration of the proper handwashing technique.

Source:  CDC, David Gravelle

Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 10:59

If you feel sick, even after a negative test result, you should take precautions, including isolating yourself in order to protect others.

 

CDC expects that widespread U.S. transmission of COVID-19. In the coming months, most of the U.S. population will be exposed to this virus. You should continue to practice all the protective measures recommended to keep yourself and others free from illness. See “How to Protect Yourself” on the CDC website.

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 21:11

On April 17, Marin County Public Health announced a public health order requiring the use of face coverings when completing essential activities. This order, which remains in effect, requires most individuals to wear a face covering when they are interacting with others who are not members of their household in public and private spaces. Any child aged two years or less must not wear a face covering because of the risk of suffocation.

You do not need to wear a face covering while you are exercising outdoors by yourself, but you must keep one with you at all times to put on when you see someone approaching and ensure your nose and mouth are securely covered by the time you get within six feet of them.  Each person engaged in such activity must comply with Social Distancing Requirements including maintaining at least six feet of separation from all other people to the greatest extent possible.   

Last Updated 06/30/2020 - 07:41

You can do your part to slow the spread of COVID-19 by:

  • Staying home, leaving as infrequently as possible and only for approved activities
  • Practicing social distancing by staying at least 6 feet apart
  • Washing your hands frequently with soap and water for at least 20 seconds
  • Avoid touching your face
  • Coughing and sneezing into a tissue or your elbow
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a face cover when around others
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily

 

Source: Marin HHS, CDC

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 21:13

Not everyone needs to be tested for COVID-19.

Here is some information that might help in making decisions about seeking care or testing.

  • Most people have mild illness and are able to recover at home.
  • There is no treatment specifically approved for this virus.
  • Testing results may be helpful to inform decision-making about who you come in contact with.

Decisions about testing are based on a variety of factors including risk factors for serious illness, age, occupation, local epidemiology, and where the person is in their illness.

Clinicians should work with Marin HHS to coordinate testing through public health laboratories, or work with clinical or commercial laboratories. All test results should be reported back to Marin HHS.

Visit CDC’s COVID-19 Testing Guidance for more information.  Learn more about COVID-19 testing in Marin County by visiting our Testing Information webpage.

Source:  Marin HHS, CDC

Last Updated 05/19/2020 - 09:20

Face coverings that can be reused (e.g., bandana, washable cloth masks) should be washed with hot water and dried before reusing again.  We actually encourage the use of washable masks because hospital grade masks are difficult to obtain because they are in high demand. Remember to wash your hands after handling any used face coverings that have not yet been washed. 

If you choose to use one-time use face coverings (e.g., surgical masks), those should be disposed of in a garbage receptacle.  This would include any gloves you choose to wear.  Remember to wash your hands after removing your gloves.

Last Updated 06/25/2020 - 17:47

We recommend leaving your children at home in the care of another adult. If you have no other option, you are welcome to bring your child.

Last Updated 05/26/2020 - 10:24

In epidemiology, the curve refers to the projected number of new cases over a period of time.

In contrast to a steep rise of coronavirus infections, a more gradual uptick of cases will see the same number of people get infected, but without overburdening the health-care system at any one time.

The idea of flattening the curve is to stagger the number of new cases over a longer period so that people have better access to care.

Source:  CDC, New York Times

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 18:55

ISOLATION separates sick people with a contagious disease from people who are not sick:

  • COVID-19 positive people must isolate

QUARANTINE separates and restricts the movement of people who were exposed to a contagious disease to see if they become sick. These people may have been exposed to a disease and do not know it, or they may have the disease but do not show symptoms:

  • Close contacts of COVID-19 positive people must quarantine
Last Updated 05/22/2020 - 12:31

Even people without symptoms can have COVID-19 and give it to others. It’s important to get tested to help protect the people who you live, work, and interact with so they don’t get the virus. For adults over 65 and people with certain health conditions, being exposed to COVID-19 could be deadly. Testing is one of the best ways to protect our community and our loved ones from getting sick or dying from COVID-19.

Last Updated 05/26/2020 - 10:21

It currently takes 4-7 business days to get the results from a COVID-19 test.  Depending on your testing location, a Marin County Public Health Nurse or your doctor will call you with your test results. 

While you are waiting on your results, you must self-quarantine:

  • Do not leave your home:  Except for a medical emergency, you should not leave your home.  A household member or friend should handle any outside activities that are allowed under the shelter-in-place order, such as grocery shopping.
  • Quarantine yourself to a small space in your home: If possible, designate a room and bathroom that only you will use until you know your test results.  The smaller the area, the easier it will be to disinfect it properly.

For detailed guidance see Post-Test Isolation Guidance.

If you test positive, a Marin County Public Health representative will contact you to conduct a contact tracing investigation.  This investigation identifies any close contacts who are at high risk of exposure and will need to isolate from others and be tested for COVID-19.

Learn more about COVID-19 testing in Marin County by visiting our Testing Information webpage.

Last Updated 07/14/2020 - 13:25

Even people without symptoms can have COVID-19 and give it to others. It’s important to get tested to help protect the people who you live, work, and interact with so they don’t get the virus. For adults over 65 and people with certain health conditions, being exposed to COVID-19 could be deadly. Testing is one of the best ways to protect our community and our loved ones from getting sick or dying from COVID-19.

Last Updated 05/26/2020 - 10:21

Yes. Your personal information will not be not shared.

Test results are only shared with the referring healthcare provider and Marin Public Health. 

Marin Public Health does not release any identifying information about individuals.  The only information publicly reported is age range, race and gender.  That information is shared on Marin's Coronavirus Data Page in compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA).

Learn more about COVID-19 testing in Marin County by visiting our Testing Information webpage.

Last Updated 05/26/2020 - 10:20

At this time, due to funding limitations, we are closing the rental assistance waitlist and not accepting any new applications after Monday, June 15, 2020.

We are continuing to process requests in the order in which that they were received, but do not anticipate that all requests will be granted. Everyone on the waitlist will be notified in the coming weeks whether or not their request will be fulfilled.

Additionally, Marin County’s eviction moratorium remains in effect through September 30; renters have up to 90 days after the expiration of the resolution to repay back rent. For more information regarding the eviction moratorium, including documentation requirements, please visit www.marincounty.org/renterlandlord.

You can also watch these videos in English and Spanish that break down the moratorium’s frequently asked questions:

English: https://youtu.be/lZkcFlidEEc

Spanish: https://youtu.be/0kLAoEr0ZFc

We understand the devastating economic impacts of COVID-19 on our community, and the County of Marin will continue to seek new ways of supporting residents during this challenging time. >

Below are some other resources available for you and your family:

Marin Health and Human Services (HHS) Public Assistance Programs:

To apply for Medi-Cal, CalWORKs, CalFresh, and WIC you can:

  • Call 1.877.410.8817;
  • Apply online at c4yourself.com; or
  • Pick up a paper application in person outside at 120 N. Redwood Dr. San Rafael, CA and at the Marin County Health and Wellness Center, 3240 Kerner Blvd. San Rafael, CA 94901. Spanish and English copies are both available.
  • WIC applications are accepted over the phone by calling 415.473.6889. General Relief applications can be obtained at the locations noted above or by calling 415.473.3350.

Also visit HHS’ online Community Resource Guide, for local information on programs/services available to help with money, legal, housing and more. Lastly, if you are at risk of or currently experiencing homelessness, visit Homelessness Resource Guide, which includes a comprehensive list of . Residents can search for their nearest food pantry or emergency food distribution location using San Francisco-Marin Food Bank’s Food Locator App. For those that cannot access the app, information on food resources for older adults (age 60+) and persons with disabilities can be obtained by email 457-INFO@marincounty.org or by calling 415.457.INFO (415.457.4636). All others can call 211 to get connected to this information.

Last Updated 07/28/2020 - 14:52

If you know you have been exposed to someone with COVID-19 you should quarantine yourself in your home and contact your healthcare provider.  If you do not have a healthcare provider, call (415) 473-7191.

Even if your healthcare provider decides you do not need to be tested, you should remain quarantined until 15 days after your exposure to make sure you do not develop symptoms.

Source: Marin HHS

Last Updated 07/14/2020 - 13:25

Not everyone needs to be tested for COVID-19.

Here is some information that might help in making decisions about seeking care or testing.

  • Most people have mild illness and are able to recover at home.
  • There is no treatment specifically approved for this virus.
  • Testing results may be helpful to inform decision-making about who you come in contact with.

Decisions about testing are based on a variety of factors including risk factors for serious illness, age, occupation, local epidemiology, and where the person is in their illness.

Clinicians should work with Marin HHS to coordinate testing through public health laboratories, or work with clinical or commercial laboratories. All test results should be reported back to Marin HHS.

Visit CDC’s COVID-19 Testing Guidance for more information.  Learn more about COVID-19 testing in Marin County by visiting our Testing Information webpage.

Source:  Marin HHS, CDC

Last Updated 05/19/2020 - 09:20

We recommend leaving your children at home in the care of another adult. If you have no other option, you are welcome to bring your child.

Last Updated 05/26/2020 - 10:24

When a COVID-19 case is confirmed, our Public Health team conducts a contact investigation (also known as contact tracing), which focuses on identifying, testing and isolating people with high or medium risk of infection from a confirmed case. The contact investigation will review the places and people the confirmed cases may have come into contact with during the time the case would have been infectious. Any people or places believed to be high or medium risk will then be contacted to proceed with testing and isolation.

Below is a table from the CDC, clarifying the types of exposure that might lead to infection. Most importantly, the CDC clarifies brief encounters in the community do not carry significant risk.

Risk Level Exposures Identified Through Contact Investigation
No Identifiable Risk Interactions with a person who has symptomatic laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 that do not meet any of the high-, medium-, or low-risk conditions below, such as walking by the person or being briefly in the same room.
Low Risk Being in the same indoor environment (e.g., classroom, a hospital waiting room) as a person with symptomatic laboratory-confirmed case of COVID-19 for a period of time, but not meeting the definition of close contact
Medium Risk
  • Close contact with a person laboratory-confirmed case of COVID-19 (For COVID-19, a close contact is defined as any person who was within 6 feet of an infected person for at least 15 minutes).
  • On an aircraft, being seated within 6 feet of a traveler with symptomatic laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 infection (approximately two seats in any direction)
  • Living in the same household as, an intimate partner of, or caring for a person in a non-healthcare setting (such as a home) to a person with symptomatic-laboratory confirmed COVID-19 infection while consistently using recommended precautions for home care and home isolation
High Risk Living in the same household as, being an intimate partner of, or providing care in a nonhealthcare setting (such as a home) for a person with symptomatic laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 infection without using recommended precautions for home care and home isolation

If believe you have experienced a high or medium risk exposure to someone with COVID-19, you should quarantine yourself in your home and contact your healthcare provider.  If you do not have a healthcare provider, call (415) 473-7191.

Learn more about COVID-19 testing in Marin County by visiting our Testing Information webpage.

(Table source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control)

Last Updated 08/25/2020 - 15:10

Anyone who is in close contact or thinks they have been exposed to someone who tests positive for COVID-19 should get tested as soon as possible.

For those who will be sharing the same household and are able to quarantine at home, the Public Health staff will give advice on how to stay safe and how long to stay home. 

Once someone is recovered, if the rest of the household contacts are negative, it is safe for the person to return home and/or resume normal household activities.

Last Updated 08/25/2020 - 15:14

A nurse from Marin County Public Health will contact you and give you instructions on how to protect yourself and your family or anyone else in your household.

If you test positive, even if you do not feel sick, you should immediately isolate yourself in a room of your home away from anyone else you live with. 

Follow your healthcare provider’s advice and take all hygiene and disinfectant precautions to prevent anyone else from getting sick.  See the Quarantine and Isolation guidance for details.

Learn more about COVID-19 testing in Marin County by visiting our Testing Information webpage.

Last Updated 05/26/2020 - 10:32

No – that would be discrimination.

Last Updated 05/26/2020 - 10:35

It currently takes 4-7 business days to get the results from a COVID-19 test.  Depending on your testing location, a Marin County Public Health Nurse or your doctor will call you with your test results. 

While you are waiting on your results, you must self-quarantine:

  • Do not leave your home:  Except for a medical emergency, you should not leave your home.  A household member or friend should handle any outside activities that are allowed under the shelter-in-place order, such as grocery shopping.
  • Quarantine yourself to a small space in your home: If possible, designate a room and bathroom that only you will use until you know your test results.  The smaller the area, the easier it will be to disinfect it properly.

For detailed guidance see Post-Test Isolation Guidance.

If you test positive, a Marin County Public Health representative will contact you to conduct a contact tracing investigation.  This investigation identifies any close contacts who are at high risk of exposure and will need to isolate from others and be tested for COVID-19.

Learn more about COVID-19 testing in Marin County by visiting our Testing Information webpage.

Last Updated 07/14/2020 - 13:25

You should wash your hands for a minimum of 20 seconds using soap and water.  An easy way to “time” your hand washing is to sing the “happy birthday" song twice.

This video is a good illustration of the proper handwashing technique.

Source:  CDC, David Gravelle

Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 10:59

While not common, sometimes a person can get a false negative test result. This could be for a number of reasons including that the person was infected very shortly before the test so there was not enough of a viral load in the body to trigger a positive result.

If you continue feeling sick or develop symptoms after the test you should isolate yourself and contact your healthcare provider.

For detailed guidance see Post-Test Isolation Guidance

Learn more about COVID-19 testing in Marin County by visiting our Testing Information webpage.

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 18:42

If you feel sick, even after a negative test result, you should take precautions, including isolating yourself in order to protect others.

 

CDC expects that widespread U.S. transmission of COVID-19. In the coming months, most of the U.S. population will be exposed to this virus. You should continue to practice all the protective measures recommended to keep yourself and others free from illness. See “How to Protect Yourself” on the CDC website.

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 21:11

On April 17, Marin County Public Health announced a public health order requiring the use of face coverings when completing essential activities. This order, which remains in effect, requires most individuals to wear a face covering when they are interacting with others who are not members of their household in public and private spaces. Any child aged two years or less must not wear a face covering because of the risk of suffocation.

You do not need to wear a face covering while you are exercising outdoors by yourself, but you must keep one with you at all times to put on when you see someone approaching and ensure your nose and mouth are securely covered by the time you get within six feet of them.  Each person engaged in such activity must comply with Social Distancing Requirements including maintaining at least six feet of separation from all other people to the greatest extent possible.   

Last Updated 06/30/2020 - 07:41

If you know you have been exposed to someone with COVID-19 you should quarantine yourself in your home and contact your healthcare provider.  If you do not have a healthcare provider, call (415) 473-7191.

Even if your healthcare provider decides you do not need to be tested, you should remain quarantined until 15 days after your exposure to make sure you do not develop symptoms.

Source: Marin HHS

Last Updated 07/14/2020 - 13:25

You can do your part to slow the spread of COVID-19 by:

  • Staying home, leaving as infrequently as possible and only for approved activities
  • Practicing social distancing by staying at least 6 feet apart
  • Washing your hands frequently with soap and water for at least 20 seconds
  • Avoid touching your face
  • Coughing and sneezing into a tissue or your elbow
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a face cover when around others
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily

 

Source: Marin HHS, CDC

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 21:13

If you test positive for COVID-19 and have symptoms, you may discontinue isolation if the following conditions are met:

  • the most recent 24 hrs have passed without fever (without the use of fever-reducing meds) AND
  • improvement in respiratory symptoms (like cough, shortness of breath) AND
  • at least 10 days have passed since the symptoms first appeared (CDC updated this guidance to 10 days to reflect a longer duration of viral shedding.)

If you have no symptoms but are COVID-19 positive, you may discontinue isolation once 10 days have passed since the date of your first positive test, if you remain symptom-free. Afterward, you should continue to stay 6 feet away from others and wear a face mask as directed by the current Public Health Order.

Please read Marin County’s At Home Quarantine & Isolation Safety guidance document (published 4/5/20) for important information and practical tips.

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/disposition-in-home-patients.html

Last Updated 07/21/2020 - 19:24

Marin Public Health's team of "contact investigators" play a crucial role in the COVID-19 response. This practice is commonly referred to as contact tracing.

When a person tests positive for COVID-19, the team calls the person to gather a list of close contacts who are at high risk of exposure. Everyone on that list is then contacted to arrange for testing and quarantine in order to stop the spread of COVID-19.  While these close contacts are awaiting test results, they are commonly referred to as a Person Under Investigation (PUI).

In addition to gathering a list of close contacts, the contact investigation team evaluates symptoms and provides education regarding quarantine and/or isolation for COVID-19 infected persons, PUIs and any members of their households.

The video below from Marin's Public Health Officer provides additional information about how contact tracing works and why it is important.

Last Updated 07/13/2020 - 12:18

When a COVID-19 case is confirmed, our Public Health team conducts a contact investigation (also known as contact tracing), which focuses on identifying, testing and isolating people with high or medium risk of infection from a confirmed case. The contact investigation will review the places and people the confirmed cases may have come into contact with during the time the case would have been infectious. Any people or places believed to be high or medium risk will then be contacted to proceed with testing and isolation.

Below is a table from the CDC, clarifying the types of exposure that might lead to infection. Most importantly, the CDC clarifies brief encounters in the community do not carry significant risk.

Risk Level Exposures Identified Through Contact Investigation
No Identifiable Risk Interactions with a person who has symptomatic laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 that do not meet any of the high-, medium-, or low-risk conditions below, such as walking by the person or being briefly in the same room.
Low Risk Being in the same indoor environment (e.g., classroom, a hospital waiting room) as a person with symptomatic laboratory-confirmed case of COVID-19 for a period of time, but not meeting the definition of close contact
Medium Risk
  • Close contact with a person laboratory-confirmed case of COVID-19 (For COVID-19, a close contact is defined as any person who was within 6 feet of an infected person for at least 15 minutes).
  • On an aircraft, being seated within 6 feet of a traveler with symptomatic laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 infection (approximately two seats in any direction)
  • Living in the same household as, an intimate partner of, or caring for a person in a non-healthcare setting (such as a home) to a person with symptomatic-laboratory confirmed COVID-19 infection while consistently using recommended precautions for home care and home isolation
High Risk Living in the same household as, being an intimate partner of, or providing care in a nonhealthcare setting (such as a home) for a person with symptomatic laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 infection without using recommended precautions for home care and home isolation

If believe you have experienced a high or medium risk exposure to someone with COVID-19, you should quarantine yourself in your home and contact your healthcare provider.  If you do not have a healthcare provider, call (415) 473-7191.

Learn more about COVID-19 testing in Marin County by visiting our Testing Information webpage.

(Table source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control)

Last Updated 08/25/2020 - 15:10

Face coverings that can be reused (e.g., bandana, washable cloth masks) should be washed with hot water and dried before reusing again.  We actually encourage the use of washable masks because hospital grade masks are difficult to obtain because they are in high demand. Remember to wash your hands after handling any used face coverings that have not yet been washed. 

If you choose to use one-time use face coverings (e.g., surgical masks), those should be disposed of in a garbage receptacle.  This would include any gloves you choose to wear.  Remember to wash your hands after removing your gloves.

Last Updated 06/25/2020 - 17:47

Anyone who is in close contact or thinks they have been exposed to someone who tests positive for COVID-19 should get tested as soon as possible.

For those who will be sharing the same household and are able to quarantine at home, the Public Health staff will give advice on how to stay safe and how long to stay home. 

Once someone is recovered, if the rest of the household contacts are negative, it is safe for the person to return home and/or resume normal household activities.

Last Updated 08/25/2020 - 15:14

Yes. Your personal information will not be not shared.

Test results are only shared with the referring healthcare provider and Marin Public Health. 

Marin Public Health does not release any identifying information about individuals.  The only information publicly reported is age range, race and gender.  That information is shared on Marin's Coronavirus Data Page in compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA).

Learn more about COVID-19 testing in Marin County by visiting our Testing Information webpage.

Last Updated 05/26/2020 - 10:20

In epidemiology, the curve refers to the projected number of new cases over a period of time.

In contrast to a steep rise of coronavirus infections, a more gradual uptick of cases will see the same number of people get infected, but without overburdening the health-care system at any one time.

The idea of flattening the curve is to stagger the number of new cases over a longer period so that people have better access to care.

Source:  CDC, New York Times

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 18:55

ISOLATION separates sick people with a contagious disease from people who are not sick:

  • COVID-19 positive people must isolate

QUARANTINE separates and restricts the movement of people who were exposed to a contagious disease to see if they become sick. These people may have been exposed to a disease and do not know it, or they may have the disease but do not show symptoms:

  • Close contacts of COVID-19 positive people must quarantine
Last Updated 05/22/2020 - 12:31

No – that would be discrimination.

Last Updated 05/26/2020 - 10:35

A nurse from Marin County Public Health will contact you and give you instructions on how to protect yourself and your family or anyone else in your household.

If you test positive, even if you do not feel sick, you should immediately isolate yourself in a room of your home away from anyone else you live with. 

Follow your healthcare provider’s advice and take all hygiene and disinfectant precautions to prevent anyone else from getting sick.  See the Quarantine and Isolation guidance for details.

Learn more about COVID-19 testing in Marin County by visiting our Testing Information webpage.

Last Updated 05/26/2020 - 10:32

While not common, sometimes a person can get a false negative test result. This could be for a number of reasons including that the person was infected very shortly before the test so there was not enough of a viral load in the body to trigger a positive result.

If you continue feeling sick or develop symptoms after the test you should isolate yourself and contact your healthcare provider.

For detailed guidance see Post-Test Isolation Guidance

Learn more about COVID-19 testing in Marin County by visiting our Testing Information webpage.

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 18:42

If you test positive for COVID-19 and have symptoms, you may discontinue isolation if the following conditions are met:

  • the most recent 24 hrs have passed without fever (without the use of fever-reducing meds) AND
  • improvement in respiratory symptoms (like cough, shortness of breath) AND
  • at least 10 days have passed since the symptoms first appeared (CDC updated this guidance to 10 days to reflect a longer duration of viral shedding.)

If you have no symptoms but are COVID-19 positive, you may discontinue isolation once 10 days have passed since the date of your first positive test, if you remain symptom-free. Afterward, you should continue to stay 6 feet away from others and wear a face mask as directed by the current Public Health Order.

Please read Marin County’s At Home Quarantine & Isolation Safety guidance document (published 4/5/20) for important information and practical tips.

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/disposition-in-home-patients.html

Last Updated 07/21/2020 - 19:24

Marin Public Health's team of "contact investigators" play a crucial role in the COVID-19 response. This practice is commonly referred to as contact tracing.

When a person tests positive for COVID-19, the team calls the person to gather a list of close contacts who are at high risk of exposure. Everyone on that list is then contacted to arrange for testing and quarantine in order to stop the spread of COVID-19.  While these close contacts are awaiting test results, they are commonly referred to as a Person Under Investigation (PUI).

In addition to gathering a list of close contacts, the contact investigation team evaluates symptoms and provides education regarding quarantine and/or isolation for COVID-19 infected persons, PUIs and any members of their households.

The video below from Marin's Public Health Officer provides additional information about how contact tracing works and why it is important.

Last Updated 07/13/2020 - 12:18

Have “no contact” delivery for food where the delivery person leaves the food outside.  Immediately remove food from carry bags and dispose of bags properly.

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 22:47

Yes. Drug stores and other medical supply stores are allowed and encouraged to operate. When possible, you should have prescription medicines and healthcare supplies delivered to your home. 

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 14:57

Outdoor recreational facilities that are not expressly prohibited by the Order, such as golf courses, skate parks, and athletic fields, are permitted to open only if they comply with any restrictions on access and use that are established by the Health Officer, another government agency, or other entity that manages such area to reduce crowding and risk of transmission of COVID-19.

Additionally, businesses that provide customers with recreational activities, opportunities, or instruction occurring exclusively outside, as allowed by the local jurisdiction, may operate.  These businesses must follow the Industry-Specific Guidance of the Health Officer Regarding Required Best Practices for Outdoor Recreation Activity Businesses. 

Use of outdoor recreational areas and facilities with high-touch equipment or that encourage gathering, including, but not limited to, playgrounds, gym equipment, climbing walls, and spas remain prohibited outside of residences, and all such areas shall be closed to public access including by signage and, as appropriate, by physical barriers.

 

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 16:49

Under the April 28 Shelter-In-Place Order (effective May 3, 2020), all construction projects can resume, provided they comply with the Construction Project Safety Protocols issued as part of the Order. (These protocols replace the COVID-19 Construction Field Safety Guidelines applicable to the Prior Order).

Last Updated 05/08/2020 - 13:21

Car washes that qualify as outdoor businesses under the Order may open.  An outdoor business is a business that operated primarily outdoors prior to March 16, 2020, and that has the ability to fully maintain social distancing of at least six feet between all persons. Outdoor businesses must conduct all business and transactions involving members of the public outdoors. This means that if a car wash includes an indoor facility that typically serves the public, that indoor facility must be closed to the public.

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 18:27

A comprehensive glossary of public health and epidemiology terms can be found at the Kaiser Family Foundation’s website.

 

 Source: Kaiser Family Foundation

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 20:09

We do not currently know if pregnant people have a greater chance of getting sick from COVID-19 than the general public nor whether they are more likely to have serious illness as a result. Based on available information, pregnant people seem to have the same risk as adults who are not pregnant.

However, we do know that

  • Pregnant people have changes in their bodies that may increase their risk of some infections.
  • Pregnant people have had a higher risk of severe illness when infected with viruses from the same family as COVID-19 and other viral respiratory infections, such as influenza.

 

Source: CDC

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 22:23

Individuals may continue to responsibly access Park Facilities by foot, bicycle, or other non-motorized means. Additionally, a new Parks Order went into effect on June 1 that lifts all of the Prior Order’s restrictions related to motorized access to outdoor recreation areas within Marin County (for the purpose of engaging in Essential Activities including outdoor exercise) leaving it to local jurisdictions to allow, limit or prohibit motorized access to those areas as appropriate in order to slow the transmission of COVID-19. View the Parks Order for complete details.

Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 15:44

Thanks to the collective effort of our residents, we have made progress in slowing the spread of the novel coronavirus, ensuring our hospitals are not overwhelmed with COVID-19 cases and saving lives. This progress allows us to ease some restrictions to allow businesses and activities to move forward, so long as they strictly comply with social distancing requirements, business reopening guidelines and other protections of current public health orders.

Appendix C-1 of the shelter in place order has allowed additional businesses to re-open, and Appendix C-2 of the shelter in place order has allowed certain activities to continue.

However, at this stage of the pandemic, we need to maintain many restrictions of shelter-in-place so that we do not lose the progress we have achieved. Lifting too many restrictions too soon could easily lead to a large surge in cases and result in avoidable hospitalizations and deaths, and it may also lead to longer-term economic harms.

View our reopening status in Marin, including future reopening dates.>

Last Updated 06/25/2020 - 14:07

Coronaviruses are generally thought to be spread from person-to-person through respiratory droplets. Currently there is no evidence to support transmission of COVID-19 associated with food. Before preparing or eating food it is important to always wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds for general food safety. Throughout the day wash your hands after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing, or going to the bathroom.

 

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

 

In general, because of poor survivability of these coronaviruses on surfaces, there is likely very low risk of spread from food products or packaging that are shipped over a period of days or weeks at ambient, refrigerated, or frozen temperatures.

 

Source:  CDC

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 22:48

Facilities providing healthcare operations, such as a dental facility, optometrist, orthodontist or physical therapist are permitted to operate under the Order. However, it is recommended that such facilities follow the guidance of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and California Department of Public Health (CDPH) in providing any services.

On May 7, the state issued guidance for resuming deferred and preventive dental care. It builds on the April 27, 2020, State of California Guidance, Resuming California’s Deferred and Preventive Health Care regarding prioritization and delivery of dental services. Marin County Public Health’s new order allows resumption of preventive dental care per State guidance.

Please note that dental health care personnel (DHCP) are in the very high-risk category for COVID-19 infection. Employers of DHCP are responsible for following applicable OSHA requirements, which includes Cal/OSHA's Bloodborne Pathogens, Personal Protective Equipment, and Respiratory Protection standards. Dental offices should implement source control (i.e., require facemasks or cloth face coverings) for everyone entering the dental setting. Patients with active COVID-19 infection should not receive care in a dental office.

Please review CDPH’s guidance document and fully implement infection control measures as outlined.

Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 15:52

Restaurant, café, coffee or tea shop, ice cream shop, or other foodservice location: You can either pick up food for take away or opt to dine outdoors, if the food service location you are patronizing offers that option. For outdoor dining, social distancing guidelines and all other current Public Health Order guidance pertaining to outdoor dining must be adhered to. For the full outdoor dining guidance, please visit our Marin Recovers website. These facilities can also deliver.

Walking/Biking for Exercise: The Order allows you to go outside for exercise activities like walking and running, as long as you strictly follow social distancing requirements including maintaining a distance of six feet from everyone outside your household, frequently washing hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an effective hand sanitizer, covering coughs and sneezes, and avoiding all social interaction outside the household when sick with a fever or cough. You do not need to wear a face covering while you are exercising outdoors by yourself, but you must keep one with you at all times to put on when you see someone approaching and ensure your nose and mouth are securely covered by the time you get within six feet of them. Exercise should be sought close to home. 

Places of Worship: Beginning June 5, outdoor faith-based and cultural ceremonies are allowed to proceed under the current shelter-in-place order as long as there is strict compliance with reopening guidance provided on our Marin Recovers website. Size and layout of ceremonies are restricted to help guests maintain physical distancing, among other health precautions. Please review the full guidelines for additional requirements.

Houses of faith are still encouraged to continue utilizing online virtual meeting options as much as possible to limit the spread of COVID-19, especially for members with compromised immune systems or other health concerns.

Bars, Nightclubs, Theaters: Entertainment venues are not allowed to operate.

Home Deliveries: Friends, family, or others pick up the items you need.  You can also order food and other supplies and have them delivered to your home. All deliveries are recommended to be “no contact” delivery where items are left outside your home.

Laundry Facilities: It is allowed to go to laundromats. However, it is important to practice social distancing and take care to touch as little as possible. It is recommended to take clean clothes home to fold in order not to contaminate them on potentially dirty surfaces at the laundromat.

Home service workers can keep providing services in homes if they are essential to health, safety, sanitation, the necessary operation of the home, or otherwise allowed under the current Order. Generally, this means that plumbing, pest control, important maintenance (e.g., to fix a water leak or a faulty wire), or similar services needed to maintain a safe and sanitary home are allowed. Purely cosmetic or other non-essential home services for general upkeep are not allowed and should be put off.  Home-based care for children, adults, seniors, and pets is also allowed under the Order.  

Visiting loved ones in the hospital, nursing home, skilled nursing facility, or other residential care facilities: Generally this is not allowed. There are limited exceptions, such as if you are going to the hospital with a minor who is under 18 or someone who is developmentally disabled and needs assistance. For most other situations, the order prohibits non-necessary visitation to these kinds of facilities except at the end-of-life. This is difficult, but necessary to protect hospital staff and other patients. More info: https://www.marinhhs.org/sites/default/files/files/public-health-updates/ph_alert_hospitalvisitation_02020315.pdf

Last Updated 08/31/2020 - 15:30

California Volunteers Resources https://californiavolunteers.ca.gov/get-involved/covid-19/

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 23:19

The Order allows all construction projects that are permitted under the March 19, 2020 Order of the California State Public Health Officer (the “State Shelter Order”), as long as the projects comply with the Construction Safety Protocols listed in Appendices B1 and B2 of the Order. Once they comply with the Construction Safety Protocols, construction sites do not also need to post a Site-Specific Protection Plan.  

Last Updated 05/18/2020 - 15:20

If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 get medical attention immediately. Emergency warning signs include*:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Bluish lips or face

 

*This list is not all-inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.

 

Source:   CDC

Last Updated 05/08/2020 - 14:13

Houses of Worship are not physically open for congregational activities at this time.  Check with your church, synagogue or other house of worship to see if it has virtual, online services.

Beginning June 5, outdoor faith-based and cultural ceremonies are allowed to proceed under the current shelter-in-place order under the guidelines provided on our Marin Recovers website.  Size and layout of ceremonies are restricted to help guests maintain physical distancing, among other health precautions. Please review the full guidelines for additional requirements.

Houses of faith are still encouraged to continue utilizing online virtual meeting options as much as possible to limit the spread of COVID-19, especially for members with compromised immune systems or other health concerns.

Last Updated 06/25/2020 - 13:37

Outdoor recreation such as swimming, sailing, kayaking or paddleboarding in the bay or the ocean is allowed by the Order. However, individuals may access the bay or ocean for such outdoor activities only if they comply with any restrictions on access and use that are established by the Health Officer, another government agency, or other entity that manages such area to reduce crowding and risk of transmission of COVID-19.  

If you can access the bay or ocean in compliance with the Order of the Health Officer of the County of Marin Allowing Motorized Access to Certain Parks and Open Spaces, and Directing Others Remain Closed to Motorized Access, you can utilize the water as you would a park or trail for recreational activities. 

Last Updated 05/18/2020 - 15:18

Both the CDC and California State COVID Response Website have comprehensive resources to help you:

California COVID-19 Resources: https://covid19.ca.gov/resources-for-emotional-support-and-well-being/#top

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 23:05

You won’t get in trouble if you go to work. The Order allows nannies and childcare providers caring for a child in the child’s own home to continue working.  

Last Updated 05/18/2020 - 15:07

You can take your pet to the veterinarian or pet hospital. Please call first to determine if the vet has any restrictions in place.

You can walk your dog and use dog parks, so long as you abide by all social distancing requirements and maintain a minimum distance of six feet between individuals or groups of individuals from different households at all times.  Face coverings must be worn as required by the Health Officer Order for Face Coverings.  Water fountains, benches and other high-touch areas within dog parks remain off limits.  Individuals accessing dog parks should plan to bring along sufficient water for themselves and their dogs to the park.  Individuals accessing dog parks should minimize contact with gates and handles, and should bring along protective gear such as gloves and/or hand sanitizer as appropriate. 

Also note that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has released guidance advising that you treat pets as you would your human family members – you must therefore limit your interactions with dogs outside of your household.  If a person inside your household becomes sick, isolate that person from everyone else, including pets.
 

Last Updated 06/09/2020 - 10:05

The US Small Business Administration has compiled a list of resources to help small businesses facing financial challenges due to COVID-19. https://www.sba.gov/page/coronavirus-covid-19-small-business-guidance-loan-resources  

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 23:21

All recycling facilities may operate including, but not limited to, those providing for recycling of beverage containers, scrap metal, used oil, construction and demolition debris, and any other materials that can be, or are required to be, recycled by the State of California. 

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 18:13

Most people with COVID-19 will have mild symptoms and should stay at home. They should isolate themselves in a separate room/bathroom for at least 10 days after the first symptoms AND are fever free for the most recent 24 hours (without fever-reducing medicine), AND respiratory symptoms (like cough and shortness of breath) improve. 

Care at home includes bed rest, fluids, and over the counter fever reducing medicine.

If the person develops emergency warning signs for COVID-19, get medical attention immediately. Emergency warning signs include*:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Bluish lips or face

*This list is not all-inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.

While anyone in the home has, or thinks they may have, COVID-19, everyone in the home should quarantine and ensure rigorous cleaning and disinfection steps are taken every day.

For more information please read Marin County’s:

Source: Marin HHS, CDC

Last Updated 07/21/2020 - 19:34

Information and Assistance - for older adults, persons with disabilities, and family caregivers: 415-457-INFO (415-457-4636). 

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 22:29

Outdoor recreation facilities that are not expressly prohibited by the Order, such as golf courses, are permitted to open only if they comply with any restrictions on access and use that are established by the Health Officer, another government agency, or other entity that manages such areas to reduce crowding and risk of transmission of COVID-19. 

However, golfers and golf course operators must follow the provisions outlined in the Industry-Specific Guidance of the Health Officer of the County of Marin Regarding Required Best Practices for Golf Courses and Racket Clubs located at https://coronavirus.marinhhs.org/required-best-practices-golf-courses-and-racket-clubs-51520

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 18:20

Both the CDC and California State COVID Response Website have comprehensive resources to help you:

California COVID-19 Resources: https://covid19.ca.gov/resources-for-emotional-support-and-well-being/#top

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 23:06

Yes, it does, except for the following “Minimum Basic Operations,” which are defined in the following excerpt from section 15.g of the Order:

  1. The minimum necessary activities to maintain and protect the value of the business’s inventory and facilities; ensure security, safety, and sanitation; process payroll and employee benefits; provide for the delivery of existing inventory directly to residences or businesses; and related functions. For clarity, this section does not permit businesses to provide curbside pickup to customers.
  2. The minimum necessary activities to facilitate owners, employees, and contractors of the business being able to continue to work remotely from their residences, and to ensure that the business can deliver its service remotely.

Other than to maintain minimum basic operations, your employees can only work remotely from their residences. Any employees who are onsite must strictly follow the Order’s social distancing requirements, including maintaining a distance of six feet from one another (unless incompatible with the job duty), frequently washing hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an effective hand sanitizer, covering coughs and sneezes (wearing a face covering, as required in the Health Officer’s April 17, 2020 Order) and avoiding all social interaction outside the household when sick with COVID-19 symptoms (see https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html.

You must also prepare, post, and implement a Site- Specific Safety Plan (see section 15.h and Appendix A of the Order) for any facility where you are carrying out minimum basic operations, and you must provide a copy of that protocol to each employee.

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 18:00

You can leave your house to travel for Essential Activities, Essential Governmental Functions, Essential Businesses, Minimum Basic Operations, Outdoor Activities, and Outdoor Businesses listed in the Order. You may at this time drive to a park for Outdoor Activities if you can access the area in compliance with the Order of the Health Officer of the County of Marin Allowing Motorized Access to Certain Parks and Open Spaces, and Directing Others Remain Closed to Motorized Access. 

Travel that is not allowed:

  • Traveling to 2nd home
  • Traveling for vacation
  • Any non-essential travel in and out of County

Guidance on Leaving the Bay Area for Vacation

Traveling runs the risk of spreading the virus to other areas and exposing new populations. Crowded travel settings, like airports, may increase chances of getting COVID-19, if there are other travelers with coronavirus infection. The Order requires that you shelter in your place of residence. If you leave the Bay Area for vacation or another reason that is not an essential purpose exempt under the Order, then you may not be permitted to return to your residence. Depending on your unique circumstances, you may choose to delay or cancel your plans. If you do decide to travel, be sure to take steps to help prevent getting and spreading COVID-19 and other respiratory diseases during travel. For the most up-to-date COVID-19 travel information, visit CDC COVID-19 Travel page.

Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 15:39

The County of Marin has a comprehensive list of support, including unemployment filing instructions, at https://www.marincounty.org/residents/health-wellness/benefits-and-job-assistance.

Last Updated 05/08/2020 - 14:25

Yes. Composting facilities may operate and composting activities may take place. 

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 18:40

NSAIDs can be useful to control a fever and are a frequent at-home treatment for COVID-19.
Neither the World Health Organization or FDA has warned about the use of NSAIDs for COVID-19. Common over-the-counter NSAIDs include:

  • Aspirin
  • Ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil)
  • Naproxen (Aleve)

Source: WHO, FDA

Last Updated 05/22/2020 - 12:33

For assistance, please contact the Disability Rights California confidential intake line at 1-800-776-5746, available 9:00 am - 4:00 pm, Monday through Friday or For TTY call: 1-800-719-5798.

 

Disability Rights California can help you if:

  • You have questions about your legal rights during an outbreak.
  • Are seeing information that is not accessible from other agencies.
  • Feel you are experiencing an extra layer of disability discrimination during this time.
  • We can talk to you about your questions, determine how we can help, and get you the information that you need.
Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 22:34

Outdoor swimming pools may operate subject to the following limitations in addition to those required elsewhere in the Order, including compliance with Social Distancing Requirements and State Order on Face Coverings.

  • Lap swimming must be limited to one swimmer per lane, except that members of the same household or living unit may occupy a single lane.
  • Use of shared swimming areas must be limited to no more than one swimmer per 300 square feet of shared pool space.
  • Except for members of the same household, swimmers shall remain at least six feet apart at all times.
  • At least one person, separate from a lifeguard, shall be on duty at all times to ensure that the social distancing protocol applicable to the facility and all limitations herein are followed. To the extent that the swimming pool is unstaffed (e.g. HOA), the facility shall implement a maximum number of occupants to ensure social distancing, and should consider time limitations and/or a reservation system to the extent feasible.
  • Locker rooms shall be closed to the public, except for use as a restroom.
  • All gatherings shall be prohibited outside the pool, such as on pool decks, except that members of a household may observe a child or other person swimming to ensure safety and supervision.
  • All businesses operating outdoor swimming pools as a recreational activity, must follow these guidelines, as well as Industry-Specific Guidance Of The Health Officer Of The County Of Marin Regarding Required Best Practices For Outdoor Recreation Activity Businesses.
  • All businesses operating outdoor swimming pools as part of childcare, summer camp or sports camp must be in compliance with the Industry-Specific Guidance of the Health Officer of the County of Marin Regarding Required Best Practices for Childcare Establishments, Summer Camps, and Sports Camps.
Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 17:00

It is important to clean and disinfect your home frequently: 

  • Clean and disinfect any surfaces you touch. Disinfect household surfaces every day. These surfaces include counters, toilets, TV remotes, phones, doorknobs, etc. To properly clean:
  • Use EPA approved disinfectant: This chart lists all approved disinfectants that kill the COVID-19 virus.

If you do not have an EPA approved disinfectant, you can use a solution of 1/3 cup household bleach to one gallon of water. Leave the solution on the surface for five minutes to disinfect properly.

Carefully follow cleaning instructions: The amount of time a disinfectant should stay on a surface will depend on the product.  The time can vary from 30 seconds to 5 minutes.  Read the instructions on the container to know how to properly kill the virus that causes COVID-19.

Clean dirty surfaces with detergent or soap and water before disinfecting them.

Use precautions when washing soft surfaces:  

  • Wear disposable gloves when handling potentially infected laundry.  If disposable gloves are not available, disinfect the outside of reusable gloves before removing them.
  • Do not shake laundry before putting in the washing machine to avoid dispersing any virus into the air.
  • Use the warmest water setting possible (based on the manufacturer's care instructions). Thoroughly dry all clothing.
  • Clean and disinfect clothing hampers the same way you would clean and disinfect other hard surfaces.
  • It is OK to wash clothes/sheets from the isolation area with other clothes/sheets but keep isolation area laundry separate until you plan to do laundry.

Sources: Marin HHS, CDC, EPA

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 18:32

When people become worried or anxious, they sometimes look for reasons they believe cause their worries. For COVID-19, some people in the U.S. may be concerned about people who are living in or visiting areas where outbreaks occurred.  This fear and anxiety can lead to social stigma.  For example, there have been reports of stigma towards Chinese or other Asian Americans or people who were in quarantine. Stigma is associated with a lack of knowledge about how COVID-19 spreads, a need to blame someone, fears about disease and death, and gossip that spreads rumors and myths.

Stigma hurts everyone by creating more fear or anger towards ordinary people instead of the disease that is causing the problem.  In order to combat stigma, learn the facts about COVID-19 and what you can do to protect yourself and your loved ones.

 

Source:  adapted from CDC.gov

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 23:08

Beginning June 12, with permission from the local jurisdictions and/or shopping center, retailers are now able to operate their businesses as curbside, outdoor or indoor retail options following all applicable public health guidelines.

Each retailer must create, adopt, and implement a written COVID-19 Site-Specific Protection Plan that incorporates and addresses all County and State guidance.

Last Updated 09/27/2020 - 08:20

Yes, if you are a medical provider your office is encouraged to remain open. Under the Order, all medical services, including routine and preventive care, are considered essential. This includes, but is not limited to, mental health services, immunizations, well-woman exams,  allergy shots, eye exams, physical therapy, and surgeries. Preventive and non-urgent care should generally not be deferred. Many visits involve exams or procedures that must be done in person, but practitioners are encouraged to conduct appointments remotely via phone or telemedicine when it is appropriate and feasible to do so. 

Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 16:54

The CDC recommends avoiding using any kind of public transportation, ridesharing, or taxis.

Last Updated 05/08/2020 - 14:10

Please call Public Assistance Call Center (Medi-Cal, CalFresh, CalWorks): 1-877-410-8817 or visit getCalFresh.org

Last Updated 06/02/2020 - 11:47

Yes, this is permissible construction activity and must comply with the Construction Project Safety Protocols in Appendix B of the Order.  Businesses may also operate to manufacture distributed energy resource components, like solar panels. 

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 18:44

NOTE: The parks listed below are open for these services, even if they are closed to other visitors.

  • San Rafael: St. Vincent de Paul Society
  • San Rafael: Boyd Park
  • San Rafael: Library
  • San Rafael: Circle K/Burger King at Francisco East & Bellam
  • San Rafael: Ritter Center
  • Novato: Binford Road
  • Novato: Taco Bell on Rowland
Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 22:35

No. For apartment dwellers, the Order’s shelter-in-place requirements for the “household or living unit” means their own apartment unit, not the building or complex as a whole. Common recreational spaces shared with others in the apartment building or complex, like apartment gyms, and roof decks, must be closed like any other public recreational space that contains high-touch equipment or encourages gathering. 

Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 17:10

Childcare establishments, summer camps, and other educational or recreational institutions or programs allowed to operate pursuant to Section 15 of the Health Officer Order may not use or access any high-touch facilities that are otherwise prohibited in Section 15 of the Health Officer Order unless those facilities are contained within the childcare establishment’s own property. For instance, a daycare can use a playground that is contained in the daycare’s own yard, but a daycare cannot use a playground anywhere outside of its own property. 

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 17:10

Most grocery stores are cleaning carts and other items/areas in the store but you should also take precautions.  It is fine to wipe down shopping carts but be sure to read and follow the instructions of the product you are using – some require up to 4 minutes on a surface to kill viruses.  The most important thing that you can do is do not touch your face and immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds when you return from shopping.

Additional helpful hints for safe grocery shopping include:

  • Think through if you really need to…are the items on your list nice to have or need to have?
  • If you do need to go, go when there will likely be the least number of people in the store. 
  • If you are a senior citizen or have health issues, check with your store – they may have special hours for you when the fewest number of people will be there
  • Make a list and plan your route so you are not walking back and forth, and you limit the time you are there

 

Source: CDC, Sunset Magazine

Last Updated 05/08/2020 - 14:12

People can fight stigma and help, not hurt, others by providing social support. Counter stigma by learning and sharing facts. Communicating the facts that viruses do not target specific racial or ethnic groups and how COVID-19 actually spreads can help stop stigma.

Please visit the CDC website for more information on how to stop stigma related to COVID-19.

Source:  CDC.gov

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 17:29

Yes, non-essential businesses may maintain minimum basic operations. This includes making deliveries of existing inventory to people’s homes.   

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 17:36

Based on currently available information and clinical expertise, older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions might be at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

 

For more information visit: https://www.cdc.gov/aging/covid19-guidance.html

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 22:13

To identify food resources in your area, visit:  https://foodlocator.sfmfoodbank.org/  

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 23:25

Yes.  This work must comply with the Construction Project Safety Protocols in Appendices B1 and B2 of the Order or the Site Specific Protection Plan in Appendix A, as applicable. 

Last Updated 05/18/2020 - 16:41

To verify current schedules, visit https://marinmobilecare.org/.

Call to schedule a shower: (415) 497-1318

  • Novato Downtown Streets Team
    • Monday / Wednesday, 6:00 am – 8:40 am
    • 816 State Access Road
    • Bus Route: 49
    • No appointment necessary this location only
  • San Rafael Health & Wellness Campus
    • Monday / Wednesday, 6:00 am – 8:40 am
    • 3240 Kerner Blvd
    • Bus Routes: 29, 35, 36
  • San Rafael Community Center on B Street
    • Last day of service: July 16
    • Monday / Thursday, 11:00 am – 1:40 pm
    • 618 B St
  • Sausalito Marinship Park
    • Tuesday / Friday, 8:00 am – 10:40 am
    • Testa Street at Marinship Way
    • Bus Routes: 71X, 30, 92
  • Fairfax Community Church
    • Saturday, 9:00 am - 11:40 am
    • 2398 Sir Francis Drake Boulevard
    • Bus Routes: 23X, 23
Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 12:14

Apartment residents should be allowed to access facilities that are required for household cleaning and sanitation needs. Owners of apartment buildings must enhance cleaning of high-touch surfaces in these areas. Residents must observe all social distancing requirements in the Order, including: 

  • Maintain at least 6 feet of separation from other people who are not part of their own household
  • Wash their hands frequently for at least 20 seconds each time (or using hand sanitizer)
  • Cough or sneeze into a tissue or sleeve (not their hands)
  • Wear a face covering when out in public, as recommended in the Health Officer’s April 17, 2020 guidance, except if a face covering is not recommended for you (e.g., for children 2 and younger, or anyone who has trouble breathing or is unable to remove a face covering without assistance)
  • Avoid using the shared facility if they are sick
Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 17:14

Outdoor Businesses as defined under the Health Officer Order, including those businesses that formerly operated exclusively or primarily in public spaces, may open with all required and appropriate safeguards in place. Due to the nature of outdoor businesses operating exclusively or primarily in public spaces (i.e. outdoor boot camps, yoga in the park, outdoor photography or art classes, etc.), the number of individuals gathering for such an activity is strictly limited to 10 (including any instructors or business owners) at any given time.  This size limitation is due to the fact that individuals participating in such activities remain in close proximity to each other for prolonged periods of time, which increases inherent risks even though social distancing must be maintained at all times. No equipment (i.e. mats, weights, art supplies) may be shared or provided for short-term rental. Other business reopening guidelines can be found at MarinRecovers.com

The new health Order lifts all of the Prior Order’s restrictions related to motorized access to outdoor recreation areas within Marin County (“the County”), leaving it to local jurisdictions to allow, limit or prohibit motorized access to those areas as appropriate in order to slow the transmission of Novel Coronavirus Disease 2019 (“COVID-19”). In addition, portions of park facilities with high-touch equipment or that encourage gathering – including playgrounds, gym equipment, climbing walls, and benches – will remain closed.

Residents are strongly encouraged to verify the status of local parks and remaining restrictions with their local jurisdictions. Marin County Parks has curated a status list of its park locations in Marin County. In addition, One Tam maintains a similar page covering regional, state, and federal recreational lands.

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 16:42

Check in with your loved ones often. Virtual communication can help you and your loved ones feel less lonely and isolated. Consider connecting with loved ones by:

  • Telephone
  • Email
  • Mailing letters or cards
  • Text messages
  • Video chat
  • Social media

Visit the CDC for more information on what you can do.

Source: CDC

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 17:21

An outdoor business is a business that was primarily operating outdoors prior to March 16, 2020, and that has the ability to fully maintain social distancing of at least six feet between all persons.  For retail businesses, this means that more than 50% of the total floor area regularly used for product sales was outdoors prior to March 16, 2020. The Order provides some examples of common outdoor businesses, such as plant nurseries, agricultural operations, and landscaping and gardening services.  Outdoor businesses, including outdoor retail businesses, must conduct all business and transactions involving members of the public in outdoor spaces.  This means that if an outdoor business includes an indoor facility or indoor portion of its retail space that typically serves the public, that indoor facility or indoor portion of retail space must be closed to the public and all sales must take place outdoors. Employees may continue to use the indoor space as necessary and may bring products outdoors for the public.  Outdoor businesses must comply with the Order’s social distancing requirements and post a Site-Specific Protection Plan.  

Last Updated 05/18/2020 - 15:30

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory illness that can spread from person-to-person. The virus that causes COVID-19 is a novel coronavirus, meaning that is has not been previously identified so people have no immunity to it.   

Source:  CDC.gov 

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 19:57

Visit the CDC “Protect Yourself” for the most up to date information.

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 22:14

California issued a statewide moratorium on residential evictions for renters who cannot pay their rent because of COVID-19 related economic hardships. Marin County’s eviction moratorium remains in effect through July 31; residents have until September 30 to pay back rents.

Even if the moratorium is lifted at the end of July, eviction proceedings will not resume until the Judicial Council of California reverses the suspension it ordered on April 6. The order put the suspension in place until 90 days after Governor Newsom declares the state of emergency over.

If COVID-19 has impacted your ability to pay all or part of your rent, you should:

  • Explain your financial situation to your landlord and relay how much you are able to pay
  • Save all financial documents
  • Pay as much of your rent as you can

If your landlord is attempting to evict you for not paying rent and you took all of the above steps, contact a local legal aid provider.

You can find more California State financial assistance information at https://covid19.ca.gov/get-financial-help/#top.

For more information regarding the eviction moratorium in Marin, including documentation requirements, please visit www.marincounty.org/renterlandlord.

You can also watch these videos in English and Spanish that break down the moratorium’s frequently asked questions:

English: https://youtu.be/lZkcFlidEEc 

Spanish: https://youtu.be/0kLAoEr0ZFc

 

Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 11:41

Yes. This work must comply with the Construction Project Safety Protocols in Appendices B1 and B2 of the Order or the Site Specific Protection Plan in Appendix A, as applicable. 

Last Updated 05/18/2020 - 15:01
  • San Rafael: Breakfast to go - St. Vincent de Paul Society 6:30 am - 8:00am
  • San Rafael: Lunch to go - St. Vincent de Paul Society 11:00 am - 1:00 pm
Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 12:00

Pet grooming businesses are permitted to operate, beginning at 10:00 a.m. on May 22, 2020, subject to the stated limitations and conditions:

These businesses may operate for curbside/outside exchange of animals only, customers may not enter the store or mobile grooming vehicle; Grooming must be performed in a manner in which the service providers and customers maintain compliance with all applicable social distancing and facial covering requirements at all times; and

These businesses must operate in strict compliance with the Industry-Specific Guidance of the Health Officer of the County of Marin Regarding Required Best Practices for Pet Grooming Businesses.

The State of California has determined that it would be appropriate to allow these businesses to resume operation.  In addition, such services have low contact intensity. Opening these services should result in a limited increase in the number of people reentering the workforce and the overall volume of commercial activity and mitigation measures can meaningfully decrease the resulting public health risk.

Last Updated 05/28/2020 - 09:58

Public and private boat ramps may open exclusively for the purpose of facilitating motorized and non-motorized boat launching. No gatherings of any kind at or around boat ramps are permitted, and any access to other park facilities by way of boat ramps and their parking lots must be in compliance with the Order of the Health Officer of the County of Marin Allowing Motorized Access to Certain Parks and Open Spaces, and Directing Others Remain Closed to Motorized Access. Private business and local jurisdictions operating public boat ramps may continue to limit or prevent access to their boat ramps at their sole discretion. 

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 16:52

The risk of infection from delivered foods and items is low but there are things you can do to lessen the risk:

  • Have no contact deliveries where items are left outside your home rather than handed to you directly.
  • Use gloves to unpack. Dispose of packaging immediately in the trash or recycle bin before taking off gloves.

For non-perishable items, leave them in the garage or other out of the way area until you need them.

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 21:23

Yes, blood banks, blood donation centers, and blood drives are exempt healthcare operations. If you are healthy and do not have COVID-19 symptoms, you are encouraged to donate. The need for adequate blood donations from healthy people is critical. 

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 15:40

Retail businesses that sell new or used cars at the retail level must follow all retail guidelines, and all guidelines specific to automotive dealerships and rentals, including the following:

  • Increase distances between tables/chairs in showrooms and waiting areas to ensure physical distancing for all necessary in-person meetings.
  • For Personnel management, auto dealerships will follow General Office Space guidelines for office space management.
  • Allow only one customer in vehicles during test drives with the employee sitting in opposite back seat. Both customer and employee must wear face covers as required by the Health Officer Order for Face Coverings at all times, including during a test drive.
  • Prohibit Personnel from using handshakes and similar greetings that violate social distancing protocols.
Last Updated 09/27/2020 - 08:34

Novel simply means new, so novel coronavirus is the new virus from the coronavirus family. The official name of the virus is severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) but that name is rarely used.

COVID-19 is the disease caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2.

Source: World Health Organization

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 20:02

Visit the CDC  for tips on managing stress and coping.  Additional resources include: 

  • Disaster Distress Helpline: Call 1-800-985-5990 (TTY 800-846-8517) or text TalkWithUs to 66746 for 24/7 support.
  • Crisis Text Line: Text HOME to 741741 for 24/7 crisis support.
  • California Suicide & Crisis Hotlines: Find phone numbers and links to all the suicide and crisis hotlines by county in California.
  • 24/7 National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: (800) 273-8255; En Espanol (888) 628-9454 Linea Nacional de Prevención del Suicidio
  • California Peer-Run Warm Line: Call 1-855-845-7415 for 24/7 non-emergency support.
  • The Friendship Line is available 24/7 as a crisis helpline for older adults: 800-971-0016 or you can text HOME to 741741 if you are feeling depressed, sad, or going through any kind of emotional crisis. A crisis worker will text you back immediately if you prefer text over the phone, this is a free service.
  • Crisis Stabilization Unit: (415) 473-6666
  • Mobile Crisis Team: (415) 473-6392
Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 12:03

Yes. State-mandated tests and operator inspections of underground storage tanks are essential activities and should continue under the Order. Repairs necessary to maintain the safety of underground storage tank systems and activities to respond to alarms and address unauthorized releases are also essential and should continue. All such work must be conducted in accordance with the Order, including adhering to social distancing requirements.  

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 18:50

The following Health (Medical) Clinics will be seeing patients on a limited basis due to COVID19 protocols:

  • Ritter
    • Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 10:00 am - 12:30 pm and 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
  • Marin City Health and Wellness
    • To address your health questions, call 415-339-8813 Monday - Friday: 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
    • Call the Marin City HHS hotline at 415-339-3135
  • Marin Community Clinics
    • 415-448-1500
Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 15:14

Restaurants, cafes, food trucks, and similar establishments are encouraged to remain open to supply meals to the public via delivery, carryout and outdoor dining. You can also purchase prepared foods at grocery stores, supermarkets, certified farmers’ markets, convenience stores, and other such food retailers. 

Last Updated 07/13/2020 - 11:28

All volunteer needs will be posted to the Center for Volunteer & Nonprofit Leadership (CVNL) website and updated as needs arise. We strongly encourage you to volunteer with existing organizations and activities and follow their guidelines as well as those from the County Health Department.

Visit www.cvnl.org/covid19help  

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 23:13

Yes, funeral home providers and mortuaries may continue operating to the extent necessary for the transport, preparation, or processing of remains. This means that any employee necessary for the transport, preparation and/or processing of a body may continue to report to these facilities to conduct their work.

Last Updated 07/15/2020 - 10:37

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses. Some cause illness in people, and others, such as canine and feline coronaviruses, only infect animals. Rarely, animal coronaviruses can cause animal-to-person infection.  If that happens, there is a risk that the virus can then spread person-to-person.   
 

We suspect this occurred for the virus that causes COVID-19. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are two other examples of coronaviruses that originated from animals and then spread to people. 

Source:  CDC.gov 

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 19:59

COVID-19 is a new disease and there is limited information regarding risk factors for severe disease.

Based on currently available information and clinical expertise, older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions might be at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

Visit the CDC to learn more: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/need-extra-precautions/people-at-higher-risk.html?CDC_AA_refVal=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cdc.gov%2Fcoronavirus%2F2019-ncov%2Fspecific-groups%2Fhigh-risk-complications.html

 

Source: CDC

Last Updated 08/25/2020 - 13:27

Visit the CDC COVID-19 information for tips on how to talk to children and teens about COVID-19. 

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 23:29

Governmental entities are strongly encouraged to complete Site-Specific Protection Plans for each of their facilities that remain open for any essential governmental functions, though the Order does not require them to do so. Just as with private businesses, Site-Specific Protection Plans assist governments in implementing risk reduction measures identified by the Health Officer, ensure that government agency staff and community members accessing government services are protected, and inform government employees and members of the public visiting the facilities about their respective responsibilities to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Each department or agency continuing to perform essential governmental functions at the workplace is encouraged to complete and implement a Site-Specific Protection Plan for its facilities and post the plan where it is publicly visible.

Last Updated 05/18/2020 - 15:19

At this time, due to funding limitations, we are closing the rental assistance waitlist and not accepting any new applications after Monday, June 15, 2020.

We are continuing to process requests in the order in which that they were received, but do not anticipate that all requests will be granted. Everyone on the waitlist will be notified in the coming weeks whether or not their request will be fulfilled.

More information can be found here.

Visit the County of Marin's Emergency Rental Assistance Program website for more information and updates on the Emergency Rental Assistance Program.

Ritter Center Care Management Services

Due to the overwhelming need for emergency rental assistance help, the County and the contracted agencies are only taking requests for financial assistance through the Marin Health and Human Services COVID information line. The COVID-19 Information Line is 415-473-7191 (CA Relay Service Dial 711). Phone calls will be answered Monday-Friday, 9:30am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-5:00pm. You can also contact us via email at COVID-19@marincounty.org.

If you have already submitted a request by leaving a voicemail, it will be processed in the order it was received. Please note that there may be a delay in receiving a response due to the high volume of requests.

Visit the Ritter Center website for more information about the essential services offered.

Last Updated 07/16/2020 - 14:37

Schools, soup kitchens, food banks, and other entities that provide free or reduced priced food or meals to the public are encouraged to continue providing these services.

You are encouraged to take away food or have it delivered. You may also consume your meal under the guidelines of outdoor dining as long as all applicable guidance is adhered to.

Last Updated 07/16/2020 - 14:23

Yes, outdoor businesses, outdoor recreation activities, charter boat operations, and other additional business currently operating may rent equipment.  All rental equipment must be sanitized after each use and operators must follow the Industry-Specific Guidance of the Health Officer for Recreational Equipment Rental Businesses, Charter Boat OperatorsOutdoor Recreation Activity BusinessesFacial Coverings Order, and implement a Site-Specific Protection Plan.  Additionally, all charter boat operations must abide by the following Industry-Specific Guidelines of the Health Officer: Charter Boat Operators, Outdoor Recreation Activity Businesses, Recreational Equipment Rental Businesses, and Childcare Establishments, Summer Camps and Sports Camps.

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 16:32

Marin County is reopening businesses and industries in a phased approach based on COVID-19 activity and guidance received from the State of California. MarinRecovers.com is where business reopening information will be shared as more businesses are given the green light to reopen.  Use the links below to navigate reopening opening information.

Industry Reopening Status

Guidelines for Businesses to Safely Reopen (organized by industry)

Reopening Resources

 

 

Last Updated 06/24/2020 - 07:45

If you are a licensed healthcare professional, you may become part of the Marin Medical Reserve Corps or the Marin County “Surge” Unit.  Both of these opportunities are outlined in detail here: https://www.marinhhs.org/marin-county-medical-reserve-corps

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 23:14

Under the May 15th Order, businesses that manufacture essential goods or goods sold by retail businesses providing curbside retail are permitted to open if they do not have more than 50 personnel on site in the facility at any one time and comply with all Social Distancing Requirements and have a Site-Specific Protection Plan

All other manufacturing businesses, can arrange for shipping or delivery of its existing inventory directly to residences or businesses as part of allowable minimum basic operations, but it cannot continue manufacturing these products within the County.

Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 15:33

There are a number of factors that determine how serious a disease is:  

  • R0 Number:  an estimate of how many people will be infected by a person with the disease 

  • Incubation time: the time from when a person was exposed to the disease and when they first show symptoms.  People can still transmit the disease to others during this time without even knowing they are sick. 

  • Hospitalization Rate: the percentage of people with the disease who will have severe illness that requires hospitalization.  

  • Case fatality rate: the percent of people with the disease who will die of it.  

To understand how serious COVID-19 is, it can be helpful to compare it to seasonal flu based on what we currently know about COVID-19:  

 

Flu 

COVID-19 

RO Number 

1.3 

2 – 2.5 

Incubation Time 

1-4 days 

1 – 14 days 

Hospitalization Rate 

2% 

19% 

Case Fatality Rate: 

.1% or less 

1 – 3.4% 

Sources:  CDC, WHO, NCBI 

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 19:38

Visit the CDC “Protect Yourself” for the most up to date information.

Source: CDC

Last Updated 06/25/2020 - 18:16

Visit CDC for information to help you keep your children healthy.

Last Updated 06/25/2020 - 18:15

Yes. The Order allows you to go outside for exercise activities like walking and running, as long as you strictly follow social distancing requirements including:

  • Maintaining a distance of six feet from everyone outside your household;
  • Frequently washing hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an effective hand sanitizer;
  • Covering coughs and sneezes;
  • Wearing a face covering when out in public, as recommended in the June 18, 2020 State guidance for face coverings, except if a face covering is not necessarily recommended for you (e.g., for children 2 and younger, or anyone who has trouble breathing or is unable to remove a face covering without assistance); and
  • Avoiding all social interaction outside the household when sick with COVID-19 symptoms.

See https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html for more information. 

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 18:18

To contact us for essential services, please call Public Health at 415-473-7191.

Note: this number is for non-medical questions about COVID-19 (Coronavirus).

Hours of Operation: Monday – Friday, 9:30am to 12pm and 1pm to 5pm.

 

  • Adult Protective Services: 415-473-2774
  • Skilled Nursing/Assisted Living Ombudsman: 415-473-7446
  • Child Protective Services: 415-473-7153
  • Public Assistance Call Center (Medi-Cal, CalFresh, CalWorks): 1-877-410-8817
  • General Relief: 415-473-3450
  • Behavioral Health and Recovery Services Access Line: 1-888-818-1115
  • Information and Assistance - for older adults, persons with disabilities, and family caregivers: 415-457-INFO (415-457-4636)

Starting March 17, 2020, most County of Marin Health and Human Services offices and public spaces are closed. Please call ahead if you have an appointment or are required to be assisted in-person.

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 22:39

In addition to banks and credit unions, money remittance services, check cashing services, money lenders, and similar financial institutions can operate.  For businesses that mix a financial service component with a retail or other component, only the financial service can be open. 

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 14:51

Grocery stores/farmers markets, etc.: Yes. Grocery stores, certified farmers’ markets, farm and produce stands, supermarkets, food banks, convenience stores, and similar food retail establishments are encouraged to remain open to provide food and pet supplies to the public. When visiting these establishments, please help retailers maintain six feet minimum distance between patrons, including by providing ample space while shopping and waiting in line.

Restaurants, food trucks, etc.: Restaurants, cafes, food trucks, and similar establishments may remain open to supply meals to the public via delivery, carryout, and outdoor dining. You can also purchase prepared foods at grocery stores, supermarkets, certified farmers’ markets, convenience stores, and other such food retailers.

Restaurant Suppliers: Businesses that supply food goods and prepared meals to grocery stores and other food retailers are essential and may continue operating.   

Workplace Cafeterias: The cafeteria can operate like other food facilities.  It can serve food to the remaining employees, so long as the employees strictly follow the social distancing requirements in the Order.  

Last Updated 08/25/2020 - 13:20

it is by phone, email, text, or if you go to their home, please knock and back up 6 feet before they answer. Follow the safety guidelines above to keep vulnerable people safe. Try to connect people with official resources as much as possible.

NextDoor.com Help Map https://nextdoor.com/login/?next=/help_map

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 23:16

Upon completion and posting of their Site-Specific Protection Plan, plant nurseries may open under the guidance for Outdoor Business, an additional business that may provide Curbside or Indoor Retail. The full guidance that must be followed can be found here.

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 18:12

The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet). This occurs through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.  This is similar to how influenza and other respiratory pathogens spread.

 

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes. This is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads, but we are still learning more about this virus. People are thought to be most contagious when they are most symptomatic (the sickest).  People can also be contagious before they show symptoms.

 

The best way to prevent the spread of COVID-19 is to:

  • frequently wash your hands for at least 20 seconds
  • clean and disinfect surfaces – particularly those that people frequently touch
  • social distance by staying at home as much as possible and remaining at least 6 feet away from others when not at home
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when you go out in public
  • Remember to cover your cough or sneeze, then throw away used tissues and wash your hands
  • isolate yourself if you have symptoms or were in close contact with a person who has COVID-19.

 

Source:  CDC

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 19:56

This is not meant to be a complete list of stores and this information is subject to change.  Please contact your local Marin retailer to verify if/when special shopping hours are available.

  • Costco
    • Members aged 60+
    • Monday - Friday
    • 9:00am - 10:00 am
  • Nugget Markets (Novato, Corte Madera and Tiburon)
    • 65+
    • Tuesdays and Thursdays
    • 7:00am - 8:00am
  • Safeway
    • Senior citizens and at-risk members of our community
    • Tuesdays, Thursdays & Sundays
    • 6:00am - 9:00am
  • Target
    • Reserved for vulnerable guests
    • San Rafael: Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 8:00am - 9:00am
    • Marin City: Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 7:00am - 8:00am
  • Whole Foods
    • 60+ or high-risk members of our community
    • Wednesdays and Fridays
    • 7:00am - 8:00am
Last Updated 07/16/2020 - 14:42

Visit Marin County Office of Education for information on school closures.

For information about schools reopening in Fall 2020, visit Rethinking Schools: A Public Health Guided Return to Site-Based Classroom Instruction in the Age of COVID-19.

Last Updated 06/25/2020 - 13:34

If you will be outdoors and not in close contact with other people or using equipment that other people outside your household have touched, yes. Otherwise, no.

Fitness centers, gyms, fitness equipment at parks, climbing walls, and other recreational and fitness facilities with equipment that lots of people touch or areas where people gather close together are closed. 

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 17:02

Campgrounds and RV parks are permitted to operate, beginning at 7:00 a.m. on June 29, 2020, subject to the applicable guidance issued by the State of California (https://covid19.ca.gov/pdf/guidance-campgrounds.pdf. In addition to following the applicable state guidance, these businesses must adhere to the following limitations:

  • Only designated camping/RV spots may be used.
  • Each camping/RV spot may be occupied by only one household or living unit at a time.
  • If camping/RV spots are immediately adjacent to one another, there must be at least one closed camping spot between each open spot to maintain adequate distance between households or living units.

You must follow Social Distancing Requirements when visiting campgrounds.  Please note that campgrounds in the following Park Facilities remain closed: 

  • All beaches along the Pacific Ocean,  
  • Point Reyes National Seashore,  
  • Golden Gate National Recreation Area (including Muir Woods National Monument),  
  • Mount Tamalpais State Park,  
  • Tomales Bay State Park,  
  • Samuel P Taylor State Park,  
  • Chicken Ranch Beach,  
  • Bolinas Lagoon, and
  • All Marin Municipal Water District lands.   
Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 18:31

All charter boat operators must abide by the following Industry-Specific Guidance of the Health Officer: Charter Boat Operators, Outdoor Recreation Activity Businesses, Recreational Equipment Rental Businesses, and Childcare Establishments, Summer Camps and Sports Camps.  Additionally, all charter boat operators must follow all existing Health Officer Orders, including the Facial Coverings Order, and implement a Site-Specific Protection Plan

Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 11:11

Yes, youth sports leagues may operate as long as they follow the Health Officer Guidelines for Childcare Establishments, Summer Camps, Sports Camps or Youth Activities.  Under the current guidance, sports leagues can permit stable groups of up to 14 children/youth to engage in sports activities (e.g., practice, drills, etc.) where physical distancing of at least six feet can be maintained. However, these stable groups of 14 children/youth may not scrimmage or play games against children/youth in a different group.  Any coach working with a stable group of children/youth cannot work with any other group of children/youth.  Additionally, as of August 17, 2020, any child/youth participating in a sports league may participate in one other childcare establishment or youth activity during that same time period.  All childcare establishments and youth activities must operate for a minimum of three weeks.

Last Updated 08/31/2020 - 15:12

No. At this time, only children/youth (under age 18) sports leagues are permitted to operate.

Last Updated 06/05/2020 - 16:40

If your store has an entrance that opens directly to an adjacent sidewalk, street or alley, it may open for curbside pickup as long as it complies with the Site-Specific Protection Plan and the Industry-Specific Guidance Of The Health Officer Of The County Of Marin Regarding Required Best Practices For Curbside Retailers located at https://marinrecovers.com/retail/. If your store does not have an entrance that opens directly to the outside—i.e., if the only way to enter the store is by going through an indoor space—it may not open for curbside pickup at this time, however, it may open under the guidelines for Indoor Retail.

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 18:23

All retail stores reopening to provide curbside pickup must prepare a Site-Specific Protection Plan and comply with the Industry-Specific Guidance Of The Health Officer Of The County Of Marin Regarding Required Best Practices For Curbside Retailers located at https://marinrecovers.com/retail/. As part of this plan, retail stores must ensure proper social distancing, including ensuring six-feet separation between all employees. The size of your store and your ability to ensure proper social distancing will determine how many employees may work in your store at one time.

Last Updated 05/18/2020 - 14:56

Operation of retail stores for curbside pickup applies only to the sale of goods and not the provision of services. So you may sell goods at the door, but you cannot exchange shoes to be repaired at this time.

Last Updated 05/18/2020 - 16:24

Yes, the use of fitting rooms is allowed, as long as all applicable State guidance is strictly adhered to. Both customers and employees must sanitize or glove hands before handling any merchandise. Retailers should follow the state guidelines for Retailers to create a safer environment for workers and customers.

Last Updated 09/23/2020 - 16:26

There are many ways for you to express your political views without holding a physical, in-person gathering.  For example, you may continue to call or write elected officials, write letters to the editor of news publications, display lawn or window signs, or use online and other electronic media (including Zoom rooms, Twitter feeds, Facebook pages, and other digital forums) to express your views.  

You may now leave your home for many qualifying reasons as long as you do not gather with people who are not members of your household (unless they are part of your "Social Bubble").  When you are otherwise out in public, public health directives do not prevent you from engaging in political expression—such as by wearing or carrying a sign.

Whenever you are considering a protest, make sure you comply with all applicable laws, including both local and statewide public health measures.  The more restrictive of the laws will be the law that applies.

If you do wish to engage in in-person protest with a group of any size, you must follow the guidelines for outdoor political protest gatherings.

Last Updated 08/25/2020 - 15:31

With permission from the local jurisdictions and/or shopping center, Curbside Retailers may display merchandise curbside or create an outdoor retail location. Curbside Retailers must clearly designate and mark any outdoor retail location. Local jurisdictions shall have flexibility to create outdoor space use solutions that work for their communities. State guidelines for Retail must also be strictly adhered to.

Last Updated 09/27/2020 - 08:12

Yes, as explained below, although in-person protests present special public health concerns. 

Even with adherence to physical distancing, bringing members of different households together to engage in in-person protest carries a higher risk of widespread transmission of COVID-19.  Such gatherings may result in increased rates of infection, hospitalization, and death, especially among more vulnerable populations. In particular, activities like chanting, shouting, singing, and group recitation negate the risk-reduction achieved through six feet of physical distancing. For this reason, people engaging in these activities should wear face coverings at all times.

Therefore, it is strongly recommended that those exercising their right to engage in political expression (including, for example, their right to petition the government) should utilize alternative channels, such as the many online and broadcasting platforms available in the digital age, in place of in-person gatherings. 

However, the local Health Officer orders do not prohibit in-person protests as long as (1) the protest occurs outdoors, (2) attendance is limited to 25% of the relevant area’s maximum occupancy, as defined by the relevant local permitting authority or other relevant authority, or a maximum of 100 attendees, whichever is lower, and (3) physical distancing of six feet between persons or groups of persons from different households is maintained at all times. Failure to maintain adequate physical distancing may result in an order to disperse or other enforcement action. Face coverings are required pursuant to the State Order for Face Coverings.

Participants must maintain a physical distance of six feet from any uniformed peace officers and other public safety personnel present, unless otherwise directed, and follow all other requirements and directives imposed by local health officers and law enforcement, or other applicable authorities.

This limitation on attendance will be reviewed as the state continues to update its guidance on political protest gatherings. This review will assess the impacts of these imposed limits on public health and provide further direction as part of continued restoration of gatherings that implicate the First Amendment.

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 16:44

The new health Order supersedes the May 15 order. This Order lifts all of the Prior Order’s restrictions related to motorized access to outdoor recreation areas within Marin County (“the County”), leaving it to local jurisdictions to allow, limit or prohibit motorized access to those areas as appropriate in order to slow the transmission of novel Coronavirus disease 2019 (“COVID-19”).  In addition, portions of park facilities with high-touch equipment or that encourage gathering – including playgrounds, gym equipment, climbing walls, benches – will remain closed.

Residents are strongly encouraged to verify the status of local parks and remaining restrictions with their local jurisdictions. Marin County Parks has curated a status list of its park locations in Marin County. In addition, One Tam maintains a similar page covering regional, state, and federal recreational lands.

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 17:12

Yes, as of June 5, 2020, charter boats may operate in the County.  Charter boats include boats available for rent or charter for fishing, memorial services at sea, sightseeing, and other activities.  All charter boat operations must follow all existing Health Officer Orders, including the Facial Coverings Order, and implement a Site-Specific Protection Plan.  Additionally, all charter boat operations must abide by the following Industry-Specific Guidelines of the Health Officer: Charter Boat Operators, Outdoor Recreation Activity Businesses, Recreational Equipment Rental Businesses, and Childcare Establishments, Summer Camps and Sports Camps.

Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 11:12

About Coronavirus

Most healthcare providers offer testing to patients who meet testing criteria. Anyone needing testing can start by reaching out to their primary care provider.

Marin Public Health has issued new guidance to all healthcare providers expanding the criteria for testing for the virus.

Find a Testing Location

There are multiple testing options county-wide. If you are not able to obtain testing through your medical provider, free confidential testing is available in Marin and the Bay Area. Search for your nearest testing location by zipcode.

Testing for Underserved Communities

The State of California has joined with County of Marin and OptumServe to expand testing for underserved communities.  A dedicated testing site is available in San Rafael by appointment only.  Make an appointment at https://lhi.care/covidtesting. If you do not have internet access, call: 1-888-634-1123. This site is open to uninsured, underinsured, undocumented and homeless individuals. If you have medical insurance, OptumServe will bill your insurance company. Tests for uninsured individuals will be paid for by the state. 

Patients who are tested must self-quarantine pending results of their test. If someone tests positive for COVID-19, Marin County Public Health will instruct close contacts (typically household) to remain at home for 14 days after their last exposure.  Close contact is defined as being within approximately 6 feet of a COVID-19 case for at least 10 minutes or having direct contact with infectious COVID-19 secretions.

Learn more about COVID-19 testing in Marin County by visiting our Testing Information webpage.

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 18:35

There is currently no vaccine to prevent COVID-19. Although scientists are currently working on a vaccine, the process is complex and could take months or years. The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus and taking measures to protect yourself.

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 19:54

There are many types of coronavirus. Some are common and usually mild like the common cold. Others are more severe like SARS (Severe acute respiratory syndrome). A novel coronavirus is a new coronavirus that has not been previously identified. It means that people have no immunity (or protection) against the disease it causes. This novel coronavirus was identified in December 2019. The disease it causes is called COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019).

Source: CDC.gov

For more information: see information about 2019 Novel Coronavirus on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 15:21

Most healthcare providers offer testing to patients who meet testing criteria. Anyone needing testing can start by reaching out to their primary care provider.

Marin Public Health has issued new guidance to all healthcare providers expanding the criteria for testing for the virus.

Find a Testing Location

There are multiple testing options county-wide. If you are not able to obtain testing through your medical provider, free confidential testing is available in Marin and the Bay Area. Search for your nearest testing location by zipcode.

Testing for Underserved Communities

The State of California has joined with County of Marin and OptumServe to expand testing for underserved communities.  A dedicated testing site is available in San Rafael by appointment only.  Make an appointment at https://lhi.care/covidtesting. If you do not have internet access, call: 1-888-634-1123. This site is open to uninsured, underinsured, undocumented and homeless individuals. If you have medical insurance, OptumServe will bill your insurance company. Tests for uninsured individuals will be paid for by the state. 

Patients who are tested must self-quarantine pending results of their test. If someone tests positive for COVID-19, Marin County Public Health will instruct close contacts (typically household) to remain at home for 14 days after their last exposure.  Close contact is defined as being within approximately 6 feet of a COVID-19 case for at least 10 minutes or having direct contact with infectious COVID-19 secretions.

Learn more about COVID-19 testing in Marin County by visiting our Testing Information webpage.

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 18:35

The novel coronavirus may have started as an infection of animals in China, and then moved to infect people.

Last Updated 03/12/2020 - 15:41

People may be sick infected with the virus for 1 to 14 days before developing symptoms. The most common symptoms of COVID-19 are:

  • fever
  • tiredness
  • dry cough
  • shortness of breath

Most people (about 80%) recover from the disease without needing special treatment. However, if you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 get medical attention immediately. Emergency warning signs include*:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Bluish lips or face

*This list is not all inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning. 

CDC, World Health Organization

Last Updated 05/22/2020 - 12:22

Fever, cough or shortness of breath does not necessarily mean you have COVID-19.  However, in order to protect others, you should act as though you do.  Call your healthcare provider for advice. Stay at home and isolate yourself from others in your home for at least 10 days after your first symptoms AND are fever free for the most recent 24 hours (without fever-reducing medicine), AND other symptoms improve. 

Source:  Marin HHS, CDC

Last Updated 07/21/2020 - 19:30

So much of protecting yourself and your family comes down to common sense:

  • Washing hands with soap and water.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. If surfaces are dirty, clean them using detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.
  • Avoiding touching eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue or your elbow.
  • Avoiding close contact with people who are sick.
  • Staying away from work, school or other people if you become sick with respiratory symptoms like fever and cough.

If you smoke or vape, consider quitting. Smokers who already have lung disease or reduced lung capacity could be at increased risk of serious illness.

Following guidance from public health officials, including abiding by the Shelter at Home order.

Last Updated 03/31/2020 - 13:49

There is currently no vaccine to prevent COVID-19. Although scientists are currently working on a vaccine, the process is complex and could take months or years. The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus and taking measures to protect yourself.

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 19:54

Currently, there is no specific antiviral treatment for COVID-19. People with COVID-19 can seek medical care to help relieve symptoms. 

Patients who are confirmed to have COVID-19 will be cared for by healthcare professionals. Healthcare professionals will decide if a person ill with COVID-19 requires hospitalization or if home isolation is appropriate. That decision may be based on multiple factors including severity of illness, need for testing, and appropriateness of home for isolation purposes.

Care at home includes bed rest, fluids, and over the counter fever-reducing medicine. The ill person must stay away from other people and pets in their home (home isolation).

Source:  CDC, Marin County HHS

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 19:53

The CDC currently recommends that travelers avoid all non-essential travel to China and all other countries with a level 3 Alert.  Stay up to date with CDC’s travel health notices related to this outbreak. Website: cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/travelers/index.html.

Last Updated 03/12/2020 - 09:07

If you are feeling sick, first call your doctor, a nurse hotline, or an urgent care center before going to the hospital. If you are having a medical emergency, please call 911 or go to your closest emergency room.  Do not go to the emergency room of a hospital unless you are having an actual emergency. You can and should seek medical advice if you or a family member is sick. If it is not an emergency, please contact your primary care provider to determine next steps. Also, you can check online resources to help you assess symptoms if you are worried about whether you or a loved one has COVID-19. You should check www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/ for more information.  

Source:  CDC, Marin HHS   

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 15:20

No, please do not call 911 unless you have a true emergency. We have noticed an increase in 911 calls for service with patients who have fevers and minor symptoms. While we recognize many are concerned about COVID-19, such symptoms do not require 911 ambulance response. The most appropriate response to such symptoms is to reach out to your medical provider. This will allow our emergency response system to stay fully available for medical emergencies.

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 20:11

Social distancing is the same thing as physical distancing, which is a practice recommended by public health officials to stop or slow down the spread of contagious diseases. It requires the creation of physical space between individuals who may spread certain infectious diseases. The key is to minimize the number of gatherings as much as possible and to achieve space between individuals when events or activities cannot be modified, postponed, or canceled. Achieving space between individuals of approximately six feet (or more) is advisable.

Social distancing is recommended because the virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet). If you are leaving your home, you should practice physical distancing to protect yourself from COVID-19.

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 18:37

COVID-19 Testing

Testing starts with your medical provider. Anyone experiencing symptoms consistent with COVID-19 should immediately call their medical provider and seek testing.

Your medical provider will want to test for possible conditions such as flu, strep, or pneumonia. If your doctor believes you are a candidate for testing, they will refer you to either Marin Public Health or a suitable test center to conduct the testing.

Marin County Public Health also recommends testing for some groups, even if they do not have symptoms, including:

  • All persons who were notified that they were exposed to someone who was confirmed to have COVID-19; and
  • All persons who were notified by Marin Public Health as being high risk based on outbreak investigations; and
  • All essential public and private sector workers (cities and town workers included); and
  • Certain occupations with higher risk of exposures, including some healthcare workers and first responders. Testing for these individuals is arranged through their employer.

Learn more about COVID-19 testing in Marin County by visiting our Testing Information webpage.

Last Updated 05/19/2020 - 09:22

If you have symptoms consistent with COVID-19, you should contact your medical provider to discuss whether you are a candidate for testing.

There are multiple testing options county-wide. If you are not able to obtain testing through your medical provider, free confidential testing is available in Marin and the Bay Area. Search for your nearest testing location by zipcode.

Last Updated 05/08/2020 - 15:18

The State of California has joined with County of Marin and OptumServe to expand testing for underserved communities.  A dedicated testing site is available in San Rafael by appointment only.  Make an appointment at https://lhi.care/covidtesting. If you do not have internet access, call: 1-888-634-1123. This site is open to uninsured, underinsured, undocumented and homeless individuals. If you have medical insurance, OptumServe will bill your insurance company. Tests for uninsured individuals will be paid for by the state. 

The majority of people will have mild illness that is best treated at home.  However, those with serious illness will be treated regardless of insurance status.  Advisors will work with uninsured patients to find the best options for coverage.

Some resources for uninsured people include:

Source: Marin HHS, State of California

Last Updated 05/08/2020 - 15:16

As defined by the CDC, a Person Under Investigation (PUI) is any person currently under investigation for having the virus that causes COVID-19. A Person Under Investigation should be directed to COVID testing and quarantine under the guidance of their health care professional or Marin Public Health.

Source:  CDC, Marin HHS

Last Updated 05/08/2020 - 14:44

Testing starts with your medical provider. Anyone experiencing symptoms consistent with COVID-19 should immediately call their medical provider and seek testing.

Your medical provider will want to test for possible conditions such as flu, strep, or pneumonia. If your doctor believes you are a candidate for testing, they will refer you to either Marin Public Health or a suitable test center to conduct the testing.

Marin County Public Health also recommends testing for some groups, even if they do not have symptoms, including:

  • All persons who were notified that they were exposed to someone who was confirmed to have COVID-19; and
  • All persons who were notified by Marin Public Health as being high risk based on outbreak investigations; and
  • All essential public and private sector workers (cities and town workers included); and
  • Certain occupations with higher risk of exposures, including some healthcare workers and first responders. Testing for these individuals is arranged through their employer.

Learn more about COVID-19 testing in Marin County by visiting our Testing Information webpage.

Last Updated 05/19/2020 - 09:22

If you test positive for COVID-19 and have symptoms, you may discontinue isolation if the following conditions are met:

  • at minimum, the last 24 hours have passed without fever (without the use of fever-reducing medication) AND
  • improvement in respiratory symptoms (like cough, shortness of breath) AND
  • at least 10 days have passed since the symptoms first appeared

If you have no symptoms but are COVID-19 positive, you may discontinue isolation once 10 days have passed since the date of your first positive test, if you remain symptom-free. Afterward you should continue to stay 6 feet away from others and wear a face mask as directed by the current Public Health Order.

Please read Marin County’s At Home Quarantine & Isolation Safety guidance document for important information and practical tips.

Source: Marin HHS

Last Updated 07/21/2020 - 19:36

If you have symptoms consistent with COVID-19, you should contact your medical provider to discuss whether you are a candidate for testing.

There are multiple testing options county-wide. If you are not able to obtain testing through your medical provider, free confidential testing is available in Marin and the Bay Area. Search for your nearest testing location by zipcode.

Last Updated 05/08/2020 - 15:18

Follow the guidance of your doctor which may be specific to your individual health needs. In general, if you have symptoms, stay at home for at least 10 days after your symptoms have resolved.

Source: Marin HHS

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 18:36
Our current data indicate that the virus is widespread in the county and, therefore, everyone in the county has a risk of exposure to the virus regardless of where in the county they live. Every hospital in the county is caring for patients who have COVID-19. Providing information on individual cases, therefore, does not provide any benefit to the public, and may instead mislead those not living in a neighborhood with many confirmed cases to falsely think that they are at lower risk.
Last Updated 05/08/2020 - 14:53

The State of California has joined with County of Marin and OptumServe to expand testing for underserved communities.  A dedicated testing site is available in San Rafael by appointment only.  Make an appointment at https://lhi.care/covidtesting. If you do not have internet access, call: 1-888-634-1123. This site is open to uninsured, underinsured, undocumented and homeless individuals. If you have medical insurance, OptumServe will bill your insurance company. Tests for uninsured individuals will be paid for by the state. 

The majority of people will have mild illness that is best treated at home.  However, those with serious illness will be treated regardless of insurance status.  Advisors will work with uninsured patients to find the best options for coverage.

Some resources for uninsured people include:

Source: Marin HHS, State of California

Last Updated 05/08/2020 - 15:16

Yes. Marin County Public Health is actively investigating both confirmed COVID-19 cases and related cases of interest.  The latest investigation and test data can be found on the surveillance section of this website: https://coronavirus.marinhhs.org/surveillance

More laboratories in both the public and private sector are gaining the ability to perform COVID-19 testing. While this increases testing capacity, it presents challenges to make sure results are known to Public Health authorities to track incidence of disease and perform investigations of cases.  A public health Order mandating private laboratories report all COVID-19 testing data to Marin County Public Health was issued on March 24, which will allow more accurate tracking of the prevalence of COVID-19 in our community.

Learn more about COVID-19 testing and contact tracing (case investigation) in Marin County by visiting our Testing Information webpage.

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 18:33

As defined by the CDC, a Person Under Investigation (PUI) is any person currently under investigation for having the virus that causes COVID-19. A Person Under Investigation should be directed to COVID testing and quarantine under the guidance of their health care professional or Marin Public Health.

Source:  CDC, Marin HHS

Last Updated 05/08/2020 - 14:44

If you test positive for COVID-19 and have symptoms, you may discontinue isolation if the following conditions are met:

  • at minimum, the last 24 hours have passed without fever (without the use of fever-reducing medication) AND
  • improvement in respiratory symptoms (like cough, shortness of breath) AND
  • at least 10 days have passed since the symptoms first appeared

If you have no symptoms but are COVID-19 positive, you may discontinue isolation once 10 days have passed since the date of your first positive test, if you remain symptom-free. Afterward you should continue to stay 6 feet away from others and wear a face mask as directed by the current Public Health Order.

Please read Marin County’s At Home Quarantine & Isolation Safety guidance document for important information and practical tips.

Source: Marin HHS

Last Updated 07/21/2020 - 19:36

Follow the guidance of your doctor which may be specific to your individual health needs. In general, if you have symptoms, stay at home for at least 10 days after your symptoms have resolved.

Source: Marin HHS

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 18:36
Our current data indicate that the virus is widespread in the county and, therefore, everyone in the county has a risk of exposure to the virus regardless of where in the county they live. Every hospital in the county is caring for patients who have COVID-19. Providing information on individual cases, therefore, does not provide any benefit to the public, and may instead mislead those not living in a neighborhood with many confirmed cases to falsely think that they are at lower risk.
Last Updated 05/08/2020 - 14:53

Yes. Marin County Public Health is actively investigating both confirmed COVID-19 cases and related cases of interest.  The latest investigation and test data can be found on the surveillance section of this website: https://coronavirus.marinhhs.org/surveillance

More laboratories in both the public and private sector are gaining the ability to perform COVID-19 testing. While this increases testing capacity, it presents challenges to make sure results are known to Public Health authorities to track incidence of disease and perform investigations of cases.  A public health Order mandating private laboratories report all COVID-19 testing data to Marin County Public Health was issued on March 24, which will allow more accurate tracking of the prevalence of COVID-19 in our community.

Learn more about COVID-19 testing and contact tracing (case investigation) in Marin County by visiting our Testing Information webpage.

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 18:33

Pay close attention to your own symptoms and the symptoms of those you are living with. If you become symptomatic, contact your medical provider by phone. Continue to practice social distancing and good personal hand hygiene.

 

Source:  Marin HHS

Last Updated 08/24/2020 - 17:09

Pay close attention to your own symptoms and the symptoms of those you are living with. If you become symptomatic, contact your medical provider by phone. Continue to practice social distancing and good personal hand hygiene.

 

Source:  Marin HHS

Last Updated 08/24/2020 - 17:09

Business Operations

Unless your work is exempted in the Order, you cannot go to work at a physical location in the County even if you want to.  You can work from home for any business if your employer allows it and your work can be done from home. It is important that we all do our part in stopping COVID-19 – staying home is an important part of that.

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 21:08

Unless your work is exempted in the Order, you cannot go to work at a physical location in the County even if you want to.  You can work from home for any business if your employer allows it and your work can be done from home. It is important that we all do our part in stopping COVID-19 – staying home is an important part of that.

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 21:08

Yes, if they are an essential business, outdoor business or additional businesses, as described in the Order, or if they contract with a governmental entity and provide an essential governmental function. Non-profits that are allowed to continue operating include, for instance, food pantries, organizations providing housing for homeless residents, and organizations providing other critical services. Other non-profit organizations cannot continue operating their facilities, except to provide minimum basic operations, such as maintaining the value of inventory, keeping the site safe and secure, providing for the delivery of existing inventory to residences or businesses, or ensuring that employees are able to work remotely. All employees may also work remotely from their residences. 

Unless closer contact is necessary for their work, all employees must strictly comply with the Order’s social distancing requirements, including maintaining a distance of six feet from one another, frequently washing hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an effective hand sanitizer, covering coughs and sneezes, wearing a face covering, as recommended in the June 18, 2020 State guidance, except if a face covering is not necessarily recommended for them (e.g., anyone who has trouble breathing or is unable to remove a face covering without assistance) and avoiding all social interaction outside the household when sick with COVID-19 symptoms (see https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html).

Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 16:04

No.  Gun shops are not essential businesses under the Order.  The Order allows delivery of inventory directly to customers at their residences in compliance with applicable laws and regulations, but gun shops may not make sales from their storefronts. 

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 18:14

It depends. Your lab may operate only if it performs work that is exempted in the Order. Otherwise, you and your employees are allowed to perform only minimum basic operations onsite at your workplace, and must strictly comply with the Order’s social distancing requirements, including maintaining a distance of six feet from one another, frequently washing hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an effective hand sanitizer, covering coughs and sneezes, wearing a face covering, as required by the Health Officer’s April 17, 2020 order, and avoiding all social interaction outside the household when sick with COVID-19 symptoms.

You must also prepare, post, and implement a implement a Site Specific Protection Plan (see section 15 and Appendix A of the Order) for any facility where you are carrying out minimum basic operations. Other than that, employees cannot be onsite at your lab locations. 

Last Updated 05/18/2020 - 15:00

Employees and contractors of any governmental entity may continue to provide the services and products if the governmental entity determines that they are necessary to carry out an essential governmental function. 

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 17:38

Yes, cemeteries are essential infrastructure. 

Are funeral home providers and mortuaries allowed to continue operating? 

Yes, funeral home providers and mortuaries may continue operating to the extent necessary to the transport, preparation, or processing of remains. This means that any employee necessary for the transport, preparation and/or processing of a body may continue to report to these facilities to conduct their work. 

Last Updated 04/08/2020 - 18:34

Yes.  If your store sells a significant amount of groceries and hygiene products, you can keep your entire store open. 

Additionally, Indoor Retail is now allowed (at limited capacity) as long as social distancing requirements (including maintaining a distance of six feet from everyone outside your household, use of a face covering, frequently washing hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an effective hand sanitizer, covering coughs and sneezes, and avoiding all social interaction outside the household when sick with a fever or cough.) and all other guidance set forth by the current Order is adhered to.

Last Updated 09/27/2020 - 08:25

Yes, if the project you are working on is immediately necessary to the maintenance, operation, or repair of Essential Infrastructure.  Essential Infrastructure means airports, utilities (including water, sewer, gas, and electrical), oil refining, roads and highways, public transportation, solid waste facilities (including collection, removal, disposal, and processing facilities), cemeteries, mortuaries, crematoriums, and telecommunications systems (including the provision of essential global, national, and local infrastructure for internet, computing services, business infrastructure, communications, and web-based services).

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 18:37

Effective June 12, with permission from the local jurisdictions and/or shopping center, retailers are now able to operate their businesses as curbside, outdoor or indoor retail options following all applicable public health guidelines.

Each retailer must create, adopt, and implement a written COVID-19 Site-Specific Protection Plan that incorporates and addresses all County and State guidance.

Last Updated 09/27/2020 - 08:23

Generally, no. Real estate agents, escrow agents, and other service providers that facilitate real estate transactions like home sales, apartment rentals, and sale of commercial properties are essential workers, but all appointments and viewings must happen virtually (via video or livestream) to the greatest extent possible. Only if a virtual viewing is not feasible, meaning that no virtual option exists or the existing virtual option has already been used and does not fully meet the needs of the situation (i.e. a post-closing walk through or a pre-purchase showing for qualified and serious buyers), then in-person showings can occur by appointment with no more than two visitors at a time from the same household, and only one agent showing the property. In-person showings or walk-throughs are not allowed when the occupant is present in the residence.  

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 17:59

No.  If your business is covered in the list of essential businesses or otherwise permitted to operate under the Order, then you may operate your business from a facility in the County so long as you create, post, and implement a Site-Specific Protection Plan for each facility using the template attached to the Order.  You do not need to obtain any specific authorization from the County to run your business.  The County does not issue written determinations or authorizations.  

Last Updated 05/18/2020 - 15:06

Yes.

Last Updated 04/08/2020 - 17:33

No. You do not need to carry official documentation (and the County does not issue any) demonstrating that you are exempt under the Order. But be prepared to explain if requested by law enforcement why your travel is allowable under the Order. 

Last Updated 08/24/2020 - 17:22

Yes, janitorial services are allowed because they are necessary for health and sanitation.

Last Updated 04/08/2020 - 17:28

Yes.

Last Updated 04/08/2020 - 17:35

The cafeteria can operate like other food facilities.  It can serve food to the remaining employees so long as the employees strictly follow the social distancing requirements in the Order.  

Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 16:44

Medical dispensaries can dispense under healthcare industry exemptions. Suppliers to medical dispensaries and licensed medical growers can operate as well.  Non-medical cultivation, supply, and dispensing of cannabis are prohibited, with the exception of deliveries directly to residences. Dispensaries with a mixed clientele of both medical and non-medical customers can do in-person business only with medical customers. 

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 18:01

Effective June 12, you may operate your liquor store with permission from the local jurisdictions and/or shopping center, following the public health guidelines for indoor retail. You may also sell items as an Additional Business through curbside retail if permitted by State licensing requirements.

Last Updated 09/27/2020 - 08:27

No.  Businesses that supply food goods and prepared meals to grocery stores and other food retailers are essential and may continue operating.   

 

Last Updated 04/02/2020 - 14:33

No. “Essential businesses,” “outdoor businesses” and “additional businesses” providing curbside or indoor retail may keep their facilities open and continue providing their services and products to the public as permitted by the Order. Employees may leave home to go to these jobs. But all businesses are required to maximize the number of employees working from home and bring in only those employees who can’t carry out their job duties from home. Businesses that are not “essential businesses,” “outdoor businesses,” or “additional businesses” providing curbside or indoor retail as those terms are defined in the Order, must cease all activities at their facilities within the County, except to provide minimum basic operations, such as maintaining the value of a business’s inventory, keeping the business site safe and secure, ensuring that employees are able to work remotely, or providing for the delivery of existing inventory to residences or businesses.  Employees may otherwise work from home.

Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 11:04

Yes.  If your business is primarily engaged in supply or repair of cell phones or other telecommunications devices, then it is essential infrastructure and may continue to operate under the Order. 

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 18:23

Yes, but only to the extent they support or supply those essential businesses.  Warehouses and distribution centers should minimize the number of employees onsite and strictly comply with all social distancing requirements in the Order. 

  

Last Updated 04/08/2020 - 15:27

Yes.  The Order allows businesses to deliver products to people’s residences. Car dealerships can also sell or lease cars in-person while following the additional guidance listed below:

Retail businesses that sell new or used cars at the retail level must follow the all retail guidelines, as well as the following:

  • Increase distances between tables/chairs in showrooms and waiting areas to ensure necessary physical distancing
  • For personnel management, auto dealerships will follow General Office Space guidelines for office space management
  • Allow only one customer in vehicles during test drives with the employee sitting in opposite back seat. Both customer and employee must wear face covers as required by the Health Officer Order for Face Coverings at all times, including during a test drive
  • Prohibit personnel from using handshakes and similar greetings that violate social distancing protocols.
Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 16:50

No.  The Order exempts any business that is performing work related to the delivery of health care, including hospitals, clinics, COVID-19 testing locations, dentists, pharmacies, blood banks and blood drives, pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, other healthcare facilities, healthcare suppliers, home healthcare services providers, mental health providers, and veterinary care and all healthcare services provided to animals.   

Last Updated 04/08/2020 - 14:05

No.  Essential government functions will continue, including first responders, emergency management personnel, emergency dispatchers, and law enforcement.  Other government functions or offices may be subject to reduced schedules or may be closed as part of the effort to fight the spread of COVID-19.  Each government agency identifies the services that qualify as Essential Governmental Functions, and designates the personnel who will continue providing those functions. Information on the availability of County services is regularly updated on the Marin County website.

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 18:54

Coronavirus in Marin

An emergency was declared in order to ensure Marin is best prepared to address this global outbreak. Marin County Public Health is working with elected officials, other city agencies, the public and private health care system, schools, businesses and community organizations to ensure that we as a county are well informed and able to respond and mitigate the harm of the new virus.  The proclamation reinforces that this is not business as usual. We must be confident that our local response efforts are as robust as possible to protect the health of Marin residents. This declaration gives us more tools to better respond.

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 21:26

Marin County Public Health is reporting test results based on laboratory reporting to the state. On March 24, Bay Area public health officers issued an order that requires commercial labs to report all results (positive and negative). But we are still seeing lags in reporting, which makes it difficult for public health officials to provide an accurate testing picture for Marin.

You can view current test results on our data page.

Learn more about COVID-19 testing in Marin County by visiting our Testing Information webpage.

Source: Marin HHS

Last Updated 06/25/2020 - 18:14

Marin County Public Health is working closely with the California Department of Public Health (CDPH), the CDC, and our regional partners to protect our community. We are working with local healthcare providers to identify, test and support individuals who may be infected with Coronavirus and prevent further spread. The County has activated it's Medical Health Branch of the Emergency Operations Center and is  actively engaged in advanced planning with hospitals. We will be providing regular communication and guidance to the Marin community.

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 21:25

Marin County COVID-19 Guidance for  isolation and quarantine:

Isolation is when a person with COVID-19 stays away from everyone, including the people he/she lives with, in order to avoid getting others sick. A person must isolate for at least 10 days after the first symptoms AND be fever free for the most recent 24 hours (without fever-reducing medicine), and other symptoms improve. If someone is COVID-19 positive, but without symptoms, they must isolate for at least 10 days from the date of their positive test.

Quarantine is when people who have come in contact with someone sick with COVID-19, they must stay at home until they know if they are sick. A person must quarantine for 14 days after the last contact with an infected person. If you are not able to avoid contact with a person with COVID-19, you must stay in quarantine until 14 days from when the person with COVID-19 completes their isolation period. Your isolation period is likely to be at least 21 days total.

Please read Marin County’s At Home Quarantine & Isolation Safety guidance document for important information and practical tips.

 

Source:  CDC, Marin HHS

Last Updated 07/21/2020 - 19:27

The proclamation of a local emergency is a legal document that mobilizes county resources, accelerates emergency planning, streamlines staffing, coordinates agencies across Marin, allows for future reimbursement by the state and federal governments and raises awareness throughout Marin about how everyone can prepare and respond to this emergency. Marin joined San Francisco, Santa Clara and other counties in the state that have issued similar proclamations to bolster their preparedness and response.

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 21:27

Marin County Public Health is reporting test results based on laboratory reporting to the state. On March 24, Bay Area public health officers issued an order that requires commercial labs to report all results (positive and negative). But we are still seeing lags in reporting, which makes it difficult for public health officials to provide an accurate testing picture for Marin.

You can view current test results on our data page.

Learn more about COVID-19 testing in Marin County by visiting our Testing Information webpage.

Source: Marin HHS

Last Updated 06/25/2020 - 18:14

An emergency was declared in order to ensure Marin is best prepared to address this global outbreak. Marin County Public Health is working with elected officials, other city agencies, the public and private health care system, schools, businesses and community organizations to ensure that we as a county are well informed and able to respond and mitigate the harm of the new virus.  The proclamation reinforces that this is not business as usual. We must be confident that our local response efforts are as robust as possible to protect the health of Marin residents. This declaration gives us more tools to better respond.

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 21:26

The CDC recommends that you stay home for 14 days from the time you returned home from international travel to monitor your health and practice social distancing. The Department of State has issued a Global Level 4 Health Advisory external icon, which advises U.S. citizens to avoid all international travel due to the global impact of COVID-19. Visit the CDC to learn more about international travelers returning to the U.S.

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 22:12

All incoming flights to SFO from China are screened by the CDC. If people come off a plane with symptoms, the CDC will work directly with pre-identified hospitals according to disease prevention and containment procedures.

Last Updated 03/12/2020 - 09:07

Traveling runs the risk of spreading the virus to other areas and exposing new populations. Crowded travel settings, like airports, may increase chances of getting COVID-19, if there are other travelers with coronavirus infection. The Order requires that you shelter in your place of residence. If you leave the Bay Area for vacation or another reason that is not an essential purpose exempt under the Order, then you may not be permitted to return to your residence. Depending on your unique circumstances, you may choose to delay or cancel your plans. If you do decide to travel, be sure to take steps to help prevent getting and spreading COVID-19 and other respiratory diseases during travel. For the most up-to-date COVID-19 travel information, visit CDC COVID-19 Travel page.

(NOTE: link to "take steps" in 3rd Paragraph: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/prevention.html)

(NOTE: link to "CDC COVID-19 Travel Page" https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/travelers/index.html)

Last Updated 03/30/2020 - 15:18

The following resources are available to help people who may be experiencing distress or heightened anxiety right now:

  • 24/7 Behavioral Health Recovery Services Access Line: (888) 818-1115
  • 24/7 Crisis Stabilization Unit: (415) 473-6666
  • 24/7 National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: (800) 273-8255;
    Linea Nacional de Prevención del Suicidio (en Espanol): (888) 628-9454
  • If you are experiencing an emergency please call 911 immediately
Last Updated 07/13/2020 - 11:17

The County eviction moratorium prevents residents and business owners from being evicted because of a sudden loss of income tied to the COVID-19 pandemic. This ban is in effect countywide in every city, town, and unincorporated area of Marin County and lasts until September 30, 2020, unless extended by the Board of Supervisors. For more information and FAQs visit: https://www.marincounty.org/renterlandlord

Last Updated 08/24/2020 - 14:55

Throughout Marin County, 120 local public agencies rely on property tax revenues to maintain essential public services, especially during the current COVID-19 public health crisis. Friday, April 10, remains the final day to pay the 2019-2020 second installment of property taxes without penalty. Please read this press release for more information.

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 23:35

COVID-19 has no impact on the safety of your drinking water. Marin's water supply is locally sourced, with the majority of it coming from protected watersheds. Your water is purified and routinely monitored to ensure there are no viruses or pathogens. using modern treatment techniques to remove pathogens, including bacteria and viruses.

Last Updated 07/13/2020 - 12:13

This is a complicated question with a bit of nuance. Our Housing and Federal Grants Division staff members would be better equipped to answer your question. They can be reached at 415-473-7309.

Last Updated 07/16/2020 - 14:35
For more information about the moratorium, including application for funds and how to receive protection, please visit https://www.marincounty.org/renterlandlord. You may also call the Housing and Federal Grants Division at 415-473-7309.
Last Updated 03/31/2020 - 08:48

Shelter in Place

This is a legally enforceable Order issued under California law. It is a crime to violate this Order, and you may be punished by a fine, imprisonment, or both for doing so.

Last Updated 06/25/2020 - 17:32

This Order is in effect in all of Marin County. In addition, similar orders are in effect across the Bay Area, including in Santa Clara, San Francisco, San Mateo, Contra Costa, and Alameda Counties, and the City of Berkeley. As of Thursday, March 19, 2020, a similar Order went into effect for the entire state of California.

Last Updated 03/31/2020 - 14:49

 The following excerpt from the Order lists the “Essential Businesses”: 

  1. Healthcare Operations and businesses that operate, maintain, or repair Essential Infrastructure; 

  1. Grocery stores, certified farmers’ markets, farm and produce stands, supermarkets, food banks, convenience stores, and other establishments engaged in the retail sale of unprepared food, canned food, dry goods, non-alcoholic beverages, fresh fruits and vegetables, pet supply, fresh meats, fish, and poultry, as well as hygienic products and household consumer products necessary for personal hygiene or the habitability, sanitation, or operation of residences.  The businesses included in this subparagraph (ii) include establishments that sell multiple categories of products provided that they sell a significant amount of essential products identified in this subparagraph, such as liquor stores that also sell a significant amount of food.    

  1. Food cultivation, including farming, livestock, and fishing; 

  1. Businesses that provide food, shelter, and social services, and other necessities of life for economically disadvantaged or otherwise needy individuals; 

  1. Construction, but only as permitted under the State Shelter Order and only pursuant to the Construction Safety Protocols listed in Appendices B1 and B2 and incorporated into the Order by reference.  Public works projects shall also be subject to Appendices B1 and B2, except if other protocols are specified by the Health Officer;  

  1. Newspapers, television, radio, and other media services; 

  1. Gas stations and auto-supply, auto-repair (including, but not limited to, for cars, trucks, motorcycles and motorized scooters), and automotive dealerships, but only for the purpose of providing auto-supply and auto-repair services.  This subparagraph (vii) does not restrict the on-line purchase of automobiles if they are delivered to a residence or Essential Business; 

  1. Bicycle repair and supply shops;  

  1. Banks and related financial institutions; 

  1. Service providers that enable real estate transactions (including rentals, leases, and home sales), including, but not limited to, real estate agents, escrow agents, notaries, and title companies, provided that appointments and other residential viewings must only occur virtually or, if a virtual viewing is not feasible, by appointment with no more than two visitors at a time residing within the same household or living unit and one individual showing the unit (except that in person visits are not allowed when the occupant is present in the residence); 

  1. Hardware stores; 

  1. Plumbers, electricians, exterminators, and other service providers who provide services that are necessary to maintaining the habitability, sanitation, and/or operation of residences and Essential Businesses; 

  1. Businesses providing mailing and shipping services, including post office boxes; 

  1. Educational institutions—including public and private K-12 schools, colleges, and universities—for purposes of facilitating distance learning or performing essential functions, or as allowed under subparagraph xxvi, provided that social distancing of six feet per person is maintained to the greatest extent possible; 

  1. Laundromats, drycleaners, and laundry service providers; 

  1. Restaurants and other facilities that prepare and serve food, but only for delivery or carry out.  Schools and other entities that typically provide free food services to students or members of the public may continue to do so under this Order on the condition that the food is provided to students or members of the public on a pick-up and take-away basis only.  Schools and other entities that provide food services under this exemption shall not permit the food to be eaten at the site where it is provided, or at any other gathering site; 

  1. Funeral home providers, mortuaries, cemeteries, and crematoriums, to the extent necessary for the transport, preparation, or processing of bodies or remains;  

  1. Businesses that supply other Essential Businesses with the support or supplies necessary to operate, but only to the extent that they support or supply these Essential Businesses.  This exemption shall not be used as a basis for engaging in sales to the general public from retail storefronts; 

  1. Businesses that have the primary function of shipping or delivering groceries, food, or other goods directly to residences or businesses.  This exemption shall not be used to allow for manufacturing or assembly of non-essential products or for other functions besides those necessary to the delivery operation;  

  1. Airlines, taxis, rental car companies, rideshare services (including shared bicycles and scooters), and other private transportation providers providing transportation services necessary for Essential Activities and other purposes expressly authorized in this Order; 

  1. Home-based care for seniors, adults, children, and pets;   

  1. Residential facilities and shelters for seniors, adults, and children; 

  1. Professional services, such as legal, notary, or accounting services, when necessary to assist in compliance with non-elective, legally required activities or in relation to death or incapacity; 

  1. Services to assist individuals in finding employment with Essential Businesses;  

  1. Moving services that facilitate residential or commercial moves that are allowed under this Order; and 

  1. Childcare establishments, summer camps, and other educational or recreational institutions or programs providing care or supervision for children of all ages that enable owners, employees, volunteers, and contractors for Essential Businesses, Essential Governmental Functions, Outdoor Businesses, or Minimum Basic Operations to work as allowed under this Order.  To the extent possible, these operations must comply with the following conditions: 

  1. They must be carried out in stable groups of 12 or fewer children (“stable” means that the same 12 or fewer children are in the same group each day).  

  1. Children shall not change from one group to another. 

  1. If more than one group of children is at one facility, each group shall be in a separate room.  Groups shall not mix with each other. 

  1. Providers or educators shall remain solely with one group of children. 

The Health Officer will carefully monitor the changing public health situation as well as any changes to the State Shelter Order.  In the event that the State relaxes restrictions on childcare and related institutions and programs, the Health Officer will consider whether to similarly relax the restrictions imposed by this Order. 

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 16:41

All public and private gatherings of any number of people occurring outside a household or living unit are prohibited, except for the limited purposes as expressly permitted in Section 10.[1] of the Shelter at Home order. However, nothing in the Order prohibits the gathering of members already living in the same household or living unit.

Last Updated 04/01/2020 - 12:07

The intent of this Order is to ensure that people remain in their residences and minimize social interactions outside of their immediate family unit. However, you may leave your residence for reasons specified in the Order. These reasons include ensuring the health and safety of yourself and your family, engaging in outdoor activity that does not involve close contact with other people, obtaining services and supplies for yourself and your family, and to perform employment functions that are permissible under the Order.

Last Updated 03/16/2020 - 13:20

Restaurants and food facilities may offer food delivery, takeout, and outdoor dining. Marin County Environmental Health Services offers guidance for food facilities. Self-service operations are prohibited under the current Order. If your facility is offering take-out or delivery options, you should follow EHS's Environmental Health Service's website for additional updates as the Shelter In Place order continues.

Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 11:20

Our Public Health Order is effective until it is either amended or rescinded. However, the public health situation is changing rapidly. As the situation develops, the Health Officer will extend or modify this Order as necessary to slow the spread of COVID-19 to the maximum extent possible.

Last Updated 08/04/2020 - 15:17

The Order identifies an extensive list of “essential businesses.” The employees of these businesses may continue to work outside of their residences so that the businesses may continue to offer their goods and services. Employees of non-essential businesses may report to work to maintain what the Order defines as “minimum basic operations,” which are the operations necessary to maintain the value of the business’s inventory and to provide for the business’s security.

Last Updated 04/01/2020 - 14:24

The Order identifies an extensive list of “essential businesses” that may continue to serve the public in person during the term of this Order. The Order allows non-essential businesses to maintain what the Order defines as “minimum basic operations,” which are the operations necessary to maintain the value of the business’s inventory, to provide for the business’s security, and to ensure that employees can effectively work from home.

Other than to maintain minimum basic operations, your employees can only work remotely from their residences.  

Last Updated 04/02/2020 - 13:36

Generally, no.  The intent of this Order is to ensure that people remain in their residences and minimize social interactions outside of their immediate family unit or social bubble. However, the Order allows travel out of the County only to perform “essential activities,” operate “essential businesses,” or to maintain “essential governmental functions,” as those terms are defined in the Order.

Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 16:07

No. The Order specifically excludes all healthcare related functions, including not just hospitals, clinics, and healthcare providers, but also all of the companies that supply them with goods and services.

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 21:59

Public transit will continue to operate on a limited basis. Public transit can only be used to perform “essential activities,” to get to and from work to operate “essential businesses,” or to maintain “essential governmental functions,” as those terms are defined in the Order. Public transit service may be impacted during the shelter in place order. Please verify operating routes and service times with the transit operator: Golden Gate Transit & Ferry Service Marin Transit Sonoma Marin Area Rail Transit (SMART)

NOTE: Links for transit options: GGT&F: https://www.goldengate.org/golden-gate-bus--ferry-services-adjusted-during-coronavirus-pandemic/ MT: https://marintransit.org/service-alerts SMART: http://sonomamarintrain.org/schedules-fares

Last Updated 04/01/2020 - 12:12

Government employees can continue to go to work if they are designated as essential employees by their employer. Each government is responsible for determining which of its workers are essential.

Last Updated 03/16/2020 - 13:20

No. But most employees of these companies need to work from home. The only employees of these companies who can go to work are: (i) employees who are needed to maintain the minimum basic operations described in the Order; or (ii) employees who are needed to work onsite to operate, maintain, or repair Essential Infrastructure (i.e., essential global, national, and local infrastructure for internet, computing services, business infrastructure, communications, and web-based services for the community) and who cannot perform their work duties from home. 

Any employees who are onsite must strictly follow the Order’s social distancing requirements, including maintaining a distance of six feet from one another (unless incompatible with the job duty), frequently washing hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an effective hand sanitizer, covering coughs and sneezes, wearing a face covering, required by the June 18, 2020 State guidance, and avoiding all social interaction outside the household when sick with COVID-19 symptoms. Any business that is carrying out minimum basic operations at a facility in the County must also prepare, post, and implement a Site Specific Protection Plan (see section 15 and Appendix A of the Order).

Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 15:55

Most people will have minor symptoms and should:

  • call their healthcare provider for advice
  • stay at home
  • isolate from others, including household members

If you develop emergency warning signs, such as difficulty breathing, persistent pain or pressure in the chest, new confusion or inability to arouse, or bluish lips or face, seek medical attention immediately.

Source:  Marin HHS

Last Updated 05/22/2020 - 12:12

This Order requires that schools generally stop holding classes at physical locations within the County. However, schools are encouraged to provide distance learning to their students and to provide free and reduced-price lunches for takeaway or by delivery. The Order also allows schools to provide care or supervision of children to enable personnel to work for businesses allowed to operate under this Order or work as essential governmental employees, provided that: (1) children are in stable groups of 14 or fewer; (2) children do not change from one group to another; (3) multiple groups in a facility stay in separate rooms; and (4) providers or educators remain solely with one group. 

Last Updated 08/31/2020 - 13:22

Yes. Grocery stores, certified farmers’ markets, farm and produce stands, supermarkets, food banks, convenience stores, and other food retail establishments selling foods items and non-alcoholic drinks are encouraged to stay open to provide food items and pet supplies to the public. Section 6 of the Order requires all businesses allowed to operate under the Order to follow any industry-specific requirements issued by the Health Officer related to COVID-19.  The Health Officer’s requirements for essential retail and grocery stores, essential workers, and food facilities can be found here.  When visiting these places, you must help the retailer maintain Social Distancing Requirements, including while you are shopping and standing in line. 

Last Updated 07/13/2020 - 12:12

Yes. Spending time outside improves mood and wellbeing, and is particularly beneficial to children. You can go for walks, go to the park, and engage in other similar activities, but should maintain social distance (i.e. be more than 6 feet away from persons who are not part of your household) when on walks and in parks to avoid spread of the virus. You do not need to wear a face covering while you are exercising outdoors by yourself, but you must keep one with you at all times to put on when you see someone approaching and ensure your nose and mouth are securely covered by the time you get within six feet of them.

Last Updated 08/25/2020 - 17:18

No. You will continue to be able to purchase these items whenever you need them, as stores selling necessary items like grocery stores, pharmacies, and hardware stores will remain open. Please continue to buy normal quantities of these items on the same schedule you normally follow. This will ensure that there is enough for everyone. 

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 14:04

No. Instead, get exercise by taking a walk, going for a jog, or riding your bike. But maintain a social distance of at least six feet from people who are not members of your household when doing so. You do not need to wear a face covering while you are exercising outdoors by yourself, but you must keep one with you at all times to put on when you see someone approaching and ensure your nose and mouth are securely covered by the time you get within six feet of them.

Last Updated 08/25/2020 - 17:25

The Public Health Officers of the six largest counties in the Bay Area have been closely monitoring the rapidly accelerating situation with COVID-19 and it is clear that if we do not take very strong and aggressive action to slow down the spread of the disease, our hospitals and particularly our intensive care units will be overwhelmed with patients. We are taking this action to save the lives of the many higher-risk people in our community who are particularly susceptible to severe illness from COVID-19, and may die if we do not act now to slow the spread and make sure our hospitals do not get overwhelmed with a flood of patients over a short period of time.

Last Updated 03/31/2020 - 15:00

The Order specifically allows people to leave their home to buy food, purchase medicine, and purchase other necessary items. It also directs businesses selling those items to remain open, and allows employees of those businesses to keep working and to ensure those businesses are operating.

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 22:43

Yes, you can either pick up food for take away or opt to dine outdoors if the food service location you are patronizing offers that option. For outdoor dining, social distancing guidelines and all other current Public Health Order guidance pertaining to outdoor dining must be adhered to. For the full outdoor dining guidance, please visit our Marin Recovers website.

Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 11:22

Call your plumber. This Order allows service providers like plumbers, electricians, and exterminators to keep working and providing their services to the public. To obtain supplies for a DIY solution, you can also visit your hardware store, which is allowed to stay open under this Order.

Last Updated 03/16/2020 - 13:20
The intent of this Order is to ensure that people remain in their residences. However, you may travel outside of the County for reasons specified in the Order. These reasons include ensuring the health and safety of yourself and your family (e.g. you are a relative's caretaker and they live in a different county) and to perform employment functions that are permissible under the Order.

 

Last Updated 04/01/2020 - 12:40

No. For your health and safety and that of the community, we need to help each other fight the spread of COVID-19 by staying at home.

Last Updated 03/31/2020 - 09:17

Yes.  The Health Officer may make changes to the Order as more information emerges about the public health situation and may issue new orders and directives as conditions warrant.  Check the County website for updates regularly at https://coronavirus.marinhhs.org/updates?field_categories_target_id=17.  The County is working with the media to share important updates and information. 

Last Updated 08/24/2020 - 17:16

Yes, but public transit, ride-share services, or any other way of traveling can only be used for Essential Travel, which means:  

  1. Travel related to the provision of or access to Essential Activities, Essential Governmental Functions, Essential Businesses, Minimum Basic Operations, Outdoor Activities, Outdoor Businesses, Additional Businesses and Additional Activities.  

  1. Travel to care for any elderly, minors, dependents, or persons with disabilities.  

  1. Travel to or from educational institutions for purposes of receiving materials for distance learning, for receiving meals, and any other related services.  

  1. Travel to return to a place of residence from outside the County.  

  1. Travel required by law enforcement or court order.  

  1. Travel required for non-residents to return to their place of residence outside the County.  Individuals are strongly encouraged to verify that their transportation out of the County remains available and functional prior to commencing such travel.  

  1. Travel to manage after-death arrangements and burial.  

  1. Travel to arrange for shelter or avoid homelessness.  

  1. Travel to avoid domestic violence or child abuse.  

  1. Travel for parental custody arrangements.  

  1. Travel to a place to temporarily reside in a residence or other facility to avoid potentially exposing others to COVID-19, such as a hotel or other facility provided by a governmental authority for such purposes.  

When you are on public transit, you must follow the Order’s social distancing requirements to the greatest extent feasible, including maintaining a distance of six feet from everyone outside your household or living unit; frequently washing hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an effective hand sanitizer; covering coughs and sneezes; wearing a face covering when out in public, as required in the Health Officer’s April 17, 2020 Order; and avoiding all social interaction outside the household when sick with COVID-19 symptoms. 

When you use ride-share services for essential travel, keep in mind that you should avoid as much as possible being in close quarters in a vehicle that has been used by lots of other people.  

Last Updated 05/18/2020 - 15:32

Yes.  The Order allows you to go online, purchase items, and have them delivered to your home. 

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 22:05

Yes, the Order allows you to return home.

Last Updated 03/21/2020 - 11:10

Beginning August 24, 2020, Hotels, Motels and Short-term Rentals are allowed to operate for tourism purposes under the current Shelter In Place order, so long as they complete a Site-Specific Protection Plan with the reopening guidelines provided on our Marin Recovers website.

 

 

Last Updated 08/24/2020 - 14:39

Yes, mental health appointments can continue. Patients should consult with their practitioners to determine whether it is appropriate and feasible to conduct individual mental health appointments remotely.  

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 15:18

Yes, the Order permits nannies and babysitters caring for a child in the child’s own home to continue working. If families opt to have playdates, they need to keep playdates as a singular cohort. Keep the same group together and do not introduce or rotate members. By rotating members of the group, it allows kids to “pollinate” another group, which goes against the social/physical distancing practices. Play dates should follow the same guidelines for childcare centers that was issued on March 13.

Last Updated 05/04/2020 - 14:53

This Public Health Order (or a similar order) is in effect across the six most populous counties of the Bay Area, including in Marin, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Contra Costa, and Alameda Counties.  Additional counties may issue the same or similar orders. 

Last Updated 08/24/2020 - 17:19

Yes, you can use shared bikes and scooters for essential travel, such as commuting to work as an essential employee.  But keep in mind that shared bikes and scooters are not routinely sanitized.  Take precautions, including bringing sanitization wipes, not touching your face while on the bike or scooter, and washing your hands for at least 20 seconds immediately after. 

Last Updated 04/07/2020 - 17:05

Service providers like plumbers, electricians, and exterminators can keep working and providing services to the public that are necessary to maintain a livable, sanitary, and functional household.  You can call your building manager or one of these service providers, or you can also visit your hardware store to assist with making your own repairs. 

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 19:06

Yes. Arborists, landscapers, gardeners, and similar service professionals can operate as outdoor businesses, as that term is defined in the Order, but they must strictly comply with social distancing requirements.  

 

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 17:39

No. For your health and safety and that of the community, we need to help each other fight the spread of COVID-19 by staying at home.

Last Updated 03/31/2020 - 09:23

All participants in group counseling services must attend meetings remotely if they are equipped to do so. Groups should make accommodations for remote support to the maximum extent feasible. If remote participation is not feasible or advisable under the circumstances, participation may occur in person provided that there is compliance with the social distancing requirements set forth in the Order, including maintaining at least 6 foot distance between individuals and capping group size to reduce in-person interactions.  

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 15:18

A hospital cannot utilize homemade cloth masks as a substitute for regulation personal protective equipment (PPE) such as N-95 or surgical masks. Clinical trials suggest cloth masks offer poor filtration and are an inefficient form of protection against respiratory infection, especially in high-risk environments.

However, some community organizations are accepting homemade masks for use in non-clinical settings.  Inquire with your local city or town government, local public safety agency, or community center to see if they are accepting donations of handmade masks.

 

Last Updated 06/30/2020 - 08:23

This Order was issued by Health Officers of Marin, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Contra Costa, and Alameda Counties and the City of Berkeley.  Those public health professionals have the authority under state law to issue Orders to protect the health and welfare of everyone in their jurisdictions. 

Last Updated 08/24/2020 - 17:17

Yes, but only to perform essential activities or outdoor activities, to maintain essential government functions, to operate an essential business, outdoor business or additional business, or to perform minimum basic operations at a non-essential business, as those terms are defined in the Order. You can also leave to go back home or engage in other essential travel. Otherwise, the answer is no because that puts you and others in the community at risk. Keep in mind that Health Officers in neighboring counties have issued the same or similar shelter-in-place orders.  

Last Updated 05/18/2020 - 15:31

Please contact friends, family, or others you know who can provide support.  They are allowed to pick up the items you need.  You can also order food and other supplies and have them delivered to your home. If you think you might be eligible for meals on wheels, call 408-350-3246 to start the eligibility intake process. 

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 14:05

Yes, so long as the service is necessary to maintain safety and sanitation. Allowable operations include routine maintenance work like cleaning, chemical balancing and adjustments, and filtration (necessary to, for instance, prevent pool algae from blooming) and safety-oriented repairs. 

Last Updated 04/08/2020 - 17:29

Some of these services are now permitted. Please see the full guidance of what is permitted on our Marin Recovers website (Personal & Limited Services page). And of course, you may continue to use these services if your healthcare provider has determined that they are medically necessary for you. 

Last Updated 08/11/2020 - 10:16

It is mandatory. This Order is a legal Order issued under the authority of California law. You are required to comply, and it is a crime (a misdemeanor) not to follow the Order. 

Last Updated 08/24/2020 - 17:18

The Order allows you to go outside for exercise activities like walking and running, as long as you strictly follow social distancing requirements.You do not need to wear a face covering while you are exercising outdoors by yourself, but you must keep one with you at all times to put on when you see someone approaching and ensure your nose and mouth are securely covered by the time you get within six feet of them.  Each person engaged in such activity must comply with Social Distancing Requirements including maintaining a distance of six feet from everyone outside your household, frequently washing hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an effective hand sanitizer, covering coughs and sneezes, and avoiding all social interaction outside the household when sick with a fever or cough.

Last Updated 08/03/2020 - 18:45

For your safety as well as the safety of your fellow worshipers, we need to help each other fight the spread of COVID-19 by staying at home. Places of worship may offer remote access to services, such as by emails, video streaming, or teleconference.

Beginning June 5, outdoor faith-based and cultural ceremonies are allowed to proceed under the current shelter-in-place order as long as there is strict compliance with reopening guidance provided on our Marin Recovers website.  Size and layout of ceremonies are restricted to help guests maintain physical distancing, among other health precautions. Please review the full guidelines for additional requirements.

Houses of faith are still encouraged to continue utilizing online virtual meeting options as much as possible to limit the spread of COVID-19, especially for members with compromised immune systems or other health concerns.

Last Updated 06/25/2020 - 13:39

Yes. As of June 12, retailers are allowed to reopen under the current Shelter-In-Place order’s Appendix C-1. That means with permission from the local jurisdictions and/or shopping center, retailers may now offer curbside, outdoor and indoor retail options. Retailers should follow the state guidelines for Retailers to create a safer environment for workers and customers. 

Each retailer must create, adopt, and implement a written COVID-19 Site-Specific Protection Plan (SPP) prior to reopening. The SPP template combines state-level guidance published in the California State Resilience Roadmap and local Marin County public health policies.

Last Updated 09/23/2020 - 16:35

Home service workers can keep providing services in homes if they are essential to health, safety, sanitation, necessary to the operation of the home or otherwise allowed under the current Order. This includes plumbers, electricians, exterminators, and other services needed to maintain a safe and sanitary home. Home construction and repair work is also allowed, as is home-based care for children, adults, seniors, and pets.  

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 18:38

No.  Hospital cafeterias fall within the exemption for healthcare facilities and may remain open.  Hospital cafeterias must be structured to ensure six-foot minimum distancing between non-related individuals picking up food from or eating in the facility.  Hospital cafeterias should increase cleaning and sanitization to minimize risk of exposure and follow other Social Distancing Requirements specified in the Order to the maximum extent feasible. 

Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 11:01

Many businesses are not allowed to operate under this Order. Essential businesses, as defined in the Order, are allowed (and encouraged) to continue operating. Outdoor businesses, as defined in the Order, are also allowed to operate. If your work is not an essential or outdoor business or an additional business allowed by the Order, you are not allowed to go to work and your employer cannot make you go except for limited minimum basic operations such as maintaining the value of a business’s inventory, keeping the business site safe and secure, or ensuring that employees are able to work remotely. The Order does not prohibit anyone from working from home. Your employer can require you to work from home – and you can do so – if your work allows it.

Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 16:43

Many retail stores are now open for curbside pick-up, delivery and indoor retail.  We encourage residents to support local small businesses.  Also, many items can be ordered online and delivered to your home.   

Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 16:34

The intent of this Order is to ensure that people remain in their residences and minimize social interactions outside of their immediate family unit. However, you may travel outside of the County for reasons specified in the Order, including travel to care for dependents and travel required by court order. 

Last Updated 03/21/2020 - 11:17

Yes.  All employees of hospitals, clinics, and other organizations that provide healthcare, provide services to healthcare organizations, provide needed supplies to healthcare organizations, or otherwise maintain healthcare operations of all kinds may continue working. 

The Health Order does not advise or encourage health care workers over 60 to stop reporting to work. 

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 15:51

You can only leave your house for essential travel. Driving to a park or beach to get outdoors is non-essential travel and is not allowed under the Public Health Order. If you have a park or trail near your house, you can use it if you can access it in a non-motorized way.

Last Updated 03/31/2020 - 16:39

No.  Entertainment venues are not allowed to operate. 

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 14:13

Yes. Be extremely cautious when providing care to vulnerable people and ensure that you protect them and yourself by following social distancing guidelines such as washing hands before and after, using hand sanitizer, maintaining at least 6 feet of distance when possible, and coughing or sneezing into a tissue, wearing a face covering, as recommended in the Health Officer’s April 17, 2020 guidance, except if a face covering is not recommended (e.g., for children 2 and younger, or anyone who has trouble breathing or is unable to remove a face covering without assistance); and stay home if you are sick.

Last Updated 07/13/2020 - 11:11

If you leave your home to perform an essential activity (e.g., go to grocery store or visit doctor), you can reduce your risk of being infected with COVID-19 by adopting the following practices:

  • Practice social distancing at all times
  • Wash hands with soap and water when possible
  • Avoid touching frequently touched community spaces
  • Avoiding touching eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue or your elbow
  • Wear a face covering, as recommended in the June 18, 2020 State Guidance for Face Coverings, except if a face covering is not recommended (e.g., for children 2 and younger, or anyone who has trouble breathing or is unable to remove a face covering without assistance).
Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 16:18

The term “shelter in place” means to stay in your home and not leave unless it is necessary for one of the exceptions listed in the Order.

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 18:39

Yes, so long as you abide by all social distancing requirements and maintain a minimum distance of six feet between individuals or groups of individuals from different households at all times.  Face coverings must be worn as required by the State Order for Face Coverings.  Water fountains, benches and other high-touch areas within dog parks remain off limits.  Individuals accessing dog parks should plan to bring along sufficient water for themselves and their dogs to the park.  Individuals accessing dog parks should minimize contact with gates and handles, and should bring along protective gear such as gloves and/or hand sanitizer as appropriate. 

Also note that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has released guidance advising that you treat pets as you would your human family members – you must therefore limit your interactions with dogs outside of your household.  If a person inside your household becomes sick, isolate that person from everyone else, including pets.
 

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 17:05

Yes. Bike repair shops are treated as an essential business (the same as auto repair shops), but only to the extent they are necessary to facilitate essential travel.

Last Updated 03/21/2020 - 11:21

The Order allows childcare establishments, summer camps, and schools or recreational institutions to provide childcare or supervision to enable you to work for an essential business, outdoor businesses, or other businesses permitted under the Order, or to perform minimum basic operations for your business, or work as an essential governmental employee. You may also employ a nanny or babysitter to provide home-based care for your kids.  

Last Updated 06/25/2020 - 13:45

Generally no. There are limited exceptions, such as if you are going to the hospital with a minor who is under 18 or someone who is developmentally disabled and needs assistance. For most other situations, the order prohibits non-necessary visitation to these kinds of facilities except at the end-of-life. This is difficult, but necessary to protect hospital staff and other patients. More info: https://www.marinhhs.org/sites/default/files/files/public-health-updates/ph_alert_hospitalvisitation_02020315.pdf

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 16:01

Yes. In addition to the statewide order, the County Health Officer’s Order remains in effect. All residents must comply with the restrictions in both the County and State Orders. If the restrictions in the two orders are different, you must comply with the stricter of the two orders. 

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 13:39

Yes.  Please call first to determine if the vet has any restrictions in place. 

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 14:21

No. Recreational areas with equipment that lots of people touch or areas where people gather close together, like playgrounds must be closed and you cannot use them while the Order is in effect.

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 17:07

Yes, childcare establishments (as well as summer camps and other educational or recreational institutions) may open to provide care or supervision to children of all ages to enable people to work at businesses allowed to operate under this Order or work as essential governmental employees.   Childcare facilities must comply with the following mandatory conditions in the Order to the extent possible: 

  1. Childcare must be carried out in stable groups of 14 or fewer (“stable” means that the same 14 or fewer children are in the same group each day). 

  1. Children shall not change from one group to another. 

  1. If more than one group of children is cared for at one facility, each group shall be in a separate room. Groups shall not mix with each other. 

  1. Childcare providers shall remain solely with one group of children. 

Last Updated 08/31/2020 - 10:27

Sheltering in place is a more rigorous form of social distancing. 

Sheltering in place means you: 

  • Must stay at home
  • Can only leave your home for “essential activities,” “outdoor activities” or “additional activities,” to work for an “essential business,” “outdoor business” or “additional business” to provide or access “essential governmental functions,” to perform “minimum basic operations” for your employer, or for “essential travel,” as those terms are defined in the new Order (you can also see the FAQs for details)
  • Cannot host or attend any gatherings

In addition, you should also maintain at least 6 feet of separation from other people who are not in your household; wash your hands frequently for at least 20 seconds each time (or use hand sanitizer); cough or sneeze into a tissue or your sleeve (not into your hands); wear a face covering when out in public, as required in the Health Officer’s April 17, 2020 Order; and stay home if you are sick.

Last Updated 07/09/2020 - 18:41

Yes. The Order exempts travel by court order or law enforcement.

Last Updated 05/04/2020 - 14:53

Yes.  The Order allows businesses to deliver products to people’s residences.  

Last Updated 04/08/2020 - 17:45

Moving companies may continue to assist with necessary residential moves under this Order, since maintaining an available housing supply and keeping people sheltered is essential to the health and safety of the public.  Moving companies may also continue to assist with necessary commercial moves that ensure essential businesses as defined under the Order may continue operating.  Non-essential residential or commercial moves, as well as any moves for non-essential businesses, should be deferred to minimize risk of transmission.

Last Updated 03/21/2020 - 11:22

The first Shelter-In-Place Order for Marin County went into effect starting 11:59 p.m. on Monday, March 16, 2020. Since then, our Shelter-In-Place Order has been extended multiple times, and continues to remain in place until either amended or rescinded.

Last Updated 08/11/2020 - 11:55

That depends. If the friends or family members that live in another household/living unit are part of your “Social Bubble", then yes, this would be allowed as long as the visit happens outdoors and follows all other guidance for Social Bubbles. If the intended visit would be outside of your existing Social Bubble (stable cohort of 12 or less), it would not be permitted.

Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 16:25

You are subject to the same restrictions for travel as individuals currently in the County.  You may travel into the County to perform “essential activities,” work to operate “essential businesses,” or maintain “essential governmental functions” as those terms are defined in the Order.

Last Updated 03/31/2020 - 09:06

Self-storage facilities are not essential businesses, however, they can maintain minimum business operations and allow people to access their units to the extent they are accessing them for medical or other essential needs. 

Last Updated 04/29/2020 - 14:46

Generally, no. Only painters necessary for the completion of essential infrastructure as defined in this Order may continue operating while this Order is in place.

Last Updated 03/21/2020 - 11:22

The current Order will remain in place until it is superseded by a new Order or until the current Shelter in Place ends. How long the restrictions are in place will depend on what the County Health Officer decides is necessary to protect public health.

Last Updated 08/24/2020 - 17:18

Yes.  Mail and delivery services may continue to operate under the Order. 

Last Updated 04/10/2020 - 22:05

Construction Projects

  1. Projects immediately necessary to the maintenance, operation, or repair of Essential Infrastructure;  

  1. Projects associated with Healthcare Operations, including creating or expanding Healthcare Operations, provided that such construction is directly related to the COVID-19 response; 

  1. Affordable housing that is or will be income-restricted, including multi-unit or mixed-use developments containing at least 10% income-restricted units; 

  1. Public works projects if specifically designated as an Essential Governmental Function by the lead governmental agency; 

  1. Shelters and temporary housing, but not including hotels or motels; 

  1. Projects immediately necessary to provide critical non-commercial services to individuals experiencing homelessness, elderly persons, persons who are economically disadvantaged, and persons with special needs; 

  1. Construction strictly necessary to ensure that existing construction sites that must be shut down under this Order are left in a safe and secure manner, but only to the extent necessary to do so; and 

  1. Construction or repair necessary to ensure that residences and buildings containing Essential Businesses are safe, sanitary, or habitable to the extent such construction or repair cannot reasonably be delayed; 

Last Updated 04/08/2020 - 18:18

Yes, if the construction is immediately necessary to maintain the operation of essential computer or internet infrastructure.  

Last Updated 04/08/2020 - 18:36

Yes, if construction at the health center is directly related to the response to COVID-19, such as the creation or expansion of health care operations that are directly needed to provide COVID-19 related health care.

Last Updated 04/09/2020 - 15:16

Residential remodeling projects that are partly completed can continue if delaying completion would pose a safety, security, or sanitation risk to residents or impact the habitability of the residence; otherwise, they must be deferred.  

Last Updated 04/08/2020 - 18:50

You can perform work on the site only to ensure it is safe and secure while it is shut down in compliance with this Order. This includes sending employees to the construction site to secure the site and ensure it does not sustain damage. You can continue construction on the project only if strictly necessary to prevent damage to the project, e.g. completing a roof or ensuring that there is proper drainage after grading has been completed. 

Last Updated 04/08/2020 - 18:48

Yes.  Further information about the modified operations of the Building Division and Planning Division during this emergency are available here: https://www.marincounty.org/depts/cd

Last Updated 03/19/2020 - 17:26

Yes.  All quarries must complete, post, and implement a Social Distancing Protocol and provide all employees with a copy of the Protocol. They must also strictly comply with Social Distancing Requirements set forth in the Order.   

Last Updated 07/08/2020 - 15:32

You can construct only the following kinds of housing:  

  1. Affordable housing that is or will be income-restricted, including multi-unit or mixed-use developments containing at least 10% income-restricted units; 

  1. Public works projects if specifically designated as an Essential Governmental Function by the lead governmental agency; 

  1. Shelters and temporary housing, but not including hotels or motels; 

  1. Projects immediately necessary to provide critical non-commercial services to individuals experiencing homelessness, elderly persons, persons who are economically disadvantaged, and persons with special needs; 

You cannot otherwise continue construction of market-rate housing, except (i) to ensure that your existing construction sites are left in a safe and secure manner while they are shut down in compliance with this Order; or (ii) to engage in construction or repair necessary to ensure that existing market-rate housing is safe, sanitary, and habitable if that construction or repair cannot be delayed. 

 

 

Last Updated 04/08/2020 - 18:41

You must defer your remodel or renovation project unless it is necessary to restore your home to a safe, sanitary, and habitable space.

 

Last Updated 03/19/2020 - 17:27